Browsing Category Bits & Pieces

The Myrrors – “The Blood That Runs The Border”

After a caustic blast introduces the fourth album from Arizona’s Myrrors the band lays into the lyrical and tonal mood setter for Borderlands. “The Blood That Runs The Border“ is a heatstroke invocation to gods of the salt and sand. The title is particularly apt in an age of contentious nationalism that’s led to fierce protection of the imaginary (and very real) walls we conjure around ourselves. The Myrrors divine that no good will accompanies the lines in the sand we draw and they reflect back the feelings of desperation, denial and hackled defense that we pour into our plexiglass and concrete castles. The band often invokes images of nomadic travelers caked in the dust of their desert surroundings and parched as thirsty blacktop in the summer sun, so it’s only natural that they run afoul of systems built on borders.

Giving some insight to the track the band confirms, “The Blood That Runs the Border” is actually an old live standard that for whatever reason never translated into a recording until now, a time in which the issues of manufactured frontiers and the human cost of xenophobic immigration controls are perhaps more immediate than ever before. Destroy all borders, tear down all walls and the governments that build them! In a sense this track actually sowed the seeds for the entire record, from its subject matter to our conscious effort to more accurately capture the sound of The Myrrors in its current live incarnation.”

The track, along with the rest of Borderlands ably achieve a closer communion with the band’s live sound, feeling looser and wilder than they have on any album up to this. Check it out below and put the record on your radar for August.



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NRP: The Weather Prophets – Mayflower

Rounding back into the trenches of sorely overlooked fodder for vinyl reissue in a time when greatest hits albums are somehow finding their way back to the plants. The wanting bin of treasures that should be made available is too deep to measure and sadly the reissue marker isn’t set by how deserving an album is of new review, just how many copies are going to rush out the door. If the majors are going to comb their back stacks there still remain quite a few more deserving records than whatever post-Eagles solo records are in the queue. Case in point, before they found their way to Creation, a stable I’d lobby should be entirely back in print if at all possible, The Weather Prophets issued a debut for WEA. I’d submit Mayflower as an essential record and one that’s profoundly deserving of a new life among the racks.

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Loose Tooth – “You Say”

Getting genuinely excited for this Loose Tooth debut and I’m damn scuffed no one is talking about the record this side of the world. The band’s next single “You Say” is an even headier pop nug than the first taste of Keep Up. The cut is slightly brittle on the outside with a sinewy bass line knuckling its way through the track, but they open up for a soft gush of pop with those harmonies and a hook that’s all sunshine and swoon. They’re picking up goosebump punk from Cherry Red comps and 80’s indies and giving them new life for a generation ready for a little bounce in their post-punk discard pile. Can’t help feel some Kate Fagan or Holly & The Italians or The Flatbackers in this one, though it might just be that the band has gotten into the same bundle of twitchy pop rocks as those acts. Either way, its shaping ups to be a hell of an album.



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Terry – “The Whip”

Not much better news on a Wednesday morning than a new Terry album on the way. Three albums in three years, I’d say the Melbourne band is beginning to make a habit out of it and with their brand of post-punk plonk mining the years when the punks spread their wings through weirder sounds, it’s always interesting to see what the band’s been digging up. “The Whip” kicks the jangles aside, clips a driving punk guitar line to a curdled coif of organ squeal and gives this track an off the rails quality that’s biting harder than usual for the laid-back bunch. While I love the band’s cowpunk preening and clang-hearted dirges its good to see them go for the pop pounce – albeit with enough squirm to make it pure Terry. Its an art-punker kicking the New Wave kids down the stairs for coming on too soft and too slow. If this track doesn’t get you sweaty for a new Terry long player then I can’t fathom what’s eating you.

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Ty Segall & White Fence – “Body Behavior”

Its definitely good to see Ty Segall and Tim Presley jumping back in the same sandbox again for round two on their collaborative LP from way back 2012. They were both just barely eking out their own legends at that point, so Joy comes with higher stakes and a whole lot more studio wizardry behind it. They still careen down the madcap halls left barren when Barrett died, but they’re giving the take on “Body Behavior” a lot more grit. The track dips into the garage grease a bit when the guitars get their speed up, putting a bit more hair on this than some of the other tracks on the album. It doesn’t pull the track too far into modernity though, and this is still pure ’60 psych in its heart. Their collabs always come out heavier on the White Fence side of the equation, playing with Presley’s scattered pop sensibilities as a base. Though, while I love White Fence’s take on the spindly sounds piped into the psych ward of DMT casualties, I’ve always thought that he and Ty take the sound to its fullest realization together.




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Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs – “Cake of Light”

UK sludgelords Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs return with a new album on the docket for Rocket. The band is still marrying the vocal intensity of Lemmy at his sharpest and most abrasive with the twenty-foot heat wave of Monster Magnet and the relentless char of Corrosion of Conformity. The record examines the impulses behind sin and guilt, jumping off from their moniker’s obsession with sevens to explore the most notorious association with the number. The first single, the amusingly named “Cake of Light” is anchored to a juggernaut of a riff, bashing the eardrums with the hammer of fuzz as wielded by the gods of rumble themselves. If the oppressive heat hadn’t knocked the wind out of you last week, then this track will surely do the week creeping into this week.


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Primo! – “A City Stair”

Primo’s “A City Stair” is a buzzing, taut swath of jangle that’s quickly jumping the band up the list of Melbourne bands that should be on your radar. While the group had me at shaggy Melbourne post-punk, add in a crossover members who’ve spent time in Terry and The Shifters and its a sealed and signed deal. The track rumbles along on Amy Hill’s hungry bass line then takes a few zig zags through breathless guitar, trading jangles and jabs in equal measure. Bringing it home, the track melts down with a organ outro that shades the track nicely for a firm finish. The band’s album, recorded by RSTB fave Al Montfort is an absolute gem. My recommendation is to get on this one quickly. On one of the most solidly satisfying labels going, Upset The Rhythm. If you’re around EU/UK catch the band out, including a date with the always excellent Sauna Youth



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New Centre of the Universe, Vol 3

While compilations are sometimes spotty at best and label samplers often just cull up material that’s already worked its way through previous pressings and releases, Aussie label Anti-Fade has had a serious run with their New Centre of the Universe series. The first couple found their way to small press cassettes and rounded up unique tracks from King Gizzard, UV Race, Dick Diver, Chook Race, Living Eyes, Hierophants, Ausmuteants, Super Wild Horses and more. Their newest comp expands its scope and makes the move from spools to wax, topping out the LP at seventeen tracks worth of some AF staples, solidified jangle-pop stalwarts and newcomers with great promise.

Packed in the grooves is new fodder from good ol’ Anti-Fade faves like Parsnip, Alex Macfarlane and Vintage Crop, along with new material from South Hemi dusters like Terry, The Stroppies, School Damage, and Exek. But the release is not content to simply lean on the old, familiar names. “Sky High” from Traffik Island is a jangled gem. Geelong’s Gonzo bring the caustic crust and hometown vibes to the label. Billdozer brings some thick riffs and fire fuzz. It’s as accurate a barometer of burgeoning sounds from across the continent as your likely to hear in one place this year. Anti-Fade has long been a favorite label around here and this collection only proves that they’re still kicking through the right dust to find the new sounds.




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Corey Cunningham on Tom Diabo – Dark Star

Corey Cunningham is one of those artists who has popped up on RSTB so often it seems silly he’s just now finding his way to Hidden Gems. With great releases from Terry Malts and Business of Dreams packed in his catalog he’s making a mark on 2018 with the sophomore release from Smokescreens, a collaboration with Chris Rosi of Plateaus. The through line in all of Cunningham’s work has been an effervescent brand of pop that bubbles to the surface over and over again. As such, I wondered what records he’d been harboring in his sphere of influences. Corey’s picked one more hidden than most in this series, the 1988 small press LP from Tom Diabo.

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Woolen Men – “Brick Horizon”

Always a good day on the docket when there’s new music from Woolen Men to be had. The Portland band has spent their career bubbling just below the surface and threatening to break so let’s hope that their upcoming album for Dogs Table Recs give them a well-deserved spotlight. First peek into Post comes in the form of the wiry “Brick Horizon.” Built on a breathless beat and wrestling with their strings until every last bit of emotion is bashed from their fraught forms, the song is indie rock in the greatest sensed of the term. Still barreling down the road paved by their heroes The Wipers, the band picks up bits of Husker Du as well on this one. The song is as toughened and tight as they’ve ever sounded, giving good reason to be excited for their third full length to descend from the gods of angst and irreverence this Fall.



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