Browsing Category Tracks

Red Mass – “Saturn”

Montreal’s Red Mass, the loose collective centered around Roy Vucino and Hannah Lewis, are preparing their new album for No Coast/Label Étiquette in March and have sent over a new peek under the hood. “Saturn” tumbles a driving post-punk pace into grizzled garage territory. The song is dingy and driven- streaked by night and looking for lust. The drums pound high, loud, and lethal, but like New Order or The Church before them, they don’t succumb to the tropes of paint-by-post-punk, giving the song a twist with an acoustic overlay and a weave of synths. The record picked up production credits from Mingo L’indien of Les Georges Leningrad and producer/engineer Martin Bisi (Sonic Youth, Iggy Pop) and they’re definitely pushing the band into crisper territory than Red Mass has explored before. Check the new cut below and keep an eye out for the LP on March 22nd.



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Vital Idles – “Break A”

Last year Upset The Rhythm had a banner run, issuing great LPs from Terry, Primo!, Sauna Youth, and the affecting debut from Vital Idles. The latter was steeped in the best hallmarks of post-punk, churning slow-burn tension into the kind of album that winds up collector fodder for those with the right kind of ears. The band now doubles down on their sterling n’ sparse debut with a follow-up EP that’s got more of the rubber band snap of bass and bent metal beam guitars that make the best post-punk. Doing one better, though, the vocals of Jessica Higgens are tinged with just the right mix of aloof, angst, and accusations. Lead-off track “Break A” slithers through the speakers with a nighttime slink – icy, reserved, and brittle as crushed glass. The track proves that their debut was no fluke – its as good as anything that appeared there – and maybe even a head above. If this is only sharpened point of the EP, I can’t wait until the rest cuts deep and draws blood.



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The Oilies – “Psychic Dog”

A while back I posted a homespun digital single from Carly Putnam, aka The Oilies, and now the artist is stepping out with her physical debut for the always charming Fruits & Flowers. Having spent time in The Art Museums, The Mantles, Horrid Red, and The Reds, Pinks & Purples, Carly’s well versed in the pastel-hued jangles that tend to drizzle down the window panes of the sould and “Psychic Dog” doesn’t disappoint in that regard. The first cut from the EP lopes through a set of competing strums set against the click-stop backdrop of drum machine snap. The track is wistful and wanting, combining the simple charms of Marine Girls with the pulse n’ pine of Jazzateers. For those who readily wander down the lesser traveled paths of the ‘80s this is just what the grey-skied winters ordered.



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Sparrow Steeple – “Roll Baby”

Philadelphia’s Sparrow Steeple tap into an imagined lineage in which the grimoire obsessions of 70’s occult psychedelia never shook its hold on the world. Like Wolf People and Black Mountain before them they’ve sliced through the acid blotter and come out the other side dodging wizards and wolfmen with only the aid of blistering psych and folk rock to protect them. The band, which is comprised of ex-members of Strapping Fieldhands, continues the traditions of their former front, picking up a penchant for drinking songs and sea shanties wrangled into psychedelic alchemy. Album opener “Roll Baby” sees the band at their most raucous – cohering the electric shakedown with a dose of barroom harmonica (courtesy of Philly’s own “Harmonica” Dan Balcer) and some biting background vocals that give the song a dizzying off-the-rails quality. While it threatens to burn down the stage at any moment, the song holds on until the smoke dies down to smolder and ash. The band’s sophomore album is out on Trouble in Mind April 5th.



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Modern Nature – “Supernature”

As I may have mentioned before, I was saddened when Ultimate Painting not only folded last year, but also pulled their final album from release. It was a masterful pop album that deserved light, even if its creators were sent splitting in two different, irreconcilable directions. All is not lost, however. While UP has been consigned to the land of wind and ghosts, the two creative forces behind the band are, in fact, inexhaustible hubs of musical fare. It would seem that Jack Cooper is already onto his newest venture, releasing three new tracks as Modern Nature.

With a mutable lineup, that here includes keyboardist Will Young, drummer Aaron Neveu (Woods), cellist Ruper Gillett, and saxophonist Jeff Tobias (Sunwatchers), Cooper sets out to conquer a considerably more expansive end of the musical spectrum than he has dabbed in in the past. With a heavy investment in modal psych, the new EP embraces Cooper’s previous touches on psychedelic pop but drops through about six layers of mind fuzz further into the frosted ether for a sound that’s build on circular drones, sweat lodge sax hallucinations and a quasar-nudging foray into psychedelic chakra expansion. Its a surprising heel turn, but a welcome one nonetheless . Check the first track, which tops out around twelve minutes of cosmic float. The EP is out on Bella Union, March 22nd.

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Garcia Peoples – “High Noon Violence”

If you’re just now finding your way to Garcia Peoples, well, then I feel sorry for you. Their last album was a true gem of Cosmic Americana and you’ve been missing out. However, I also feel excited for you, go dive through the debut and get ready for the follow-up, which is shaping up to be another heady journey through high-minded, body-buzz jam workouts. The band lets loose today with the torrent “High Noon Violence,” a knotted gem besieged with overcast harmonies and flooded with their usual unspoken imprint of The Dead – though flashes of New Riders and Mountain Bus wash over the rinds of their guitar salad as well as this track kicks into high gear. Its a definite highlight from the upcoming Natural Facts which lands at the end of March on their old stomping grounds, Beyond Beyond is Beyond.



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Working Men’s Club – “Bad Blood”

UK post-punks Working Men’s Club act as a testament to the binge influence of the internet in 2019. Hailing from the tiny town of Todmorden, were it not for the heavy spread of access and rabbit hole drilldown of influences that pervades the tubes it seems unlikely that a group of seventeen-year-olds would produce a single that effortlessly echoes the rubber band snap of The Monochrome Set commingling with new wave keys and a touch of Medium Medium’s dance freak streak. “Bad Blood” shouldn’t sound like such a natural amalgam of the past while still feeling modern enough to drop in beside newer body shakers like Lithics, Future Punx, or School Damage but it does and we’re all better for it. This single certainly puts the band on the list to watch, but first it puts them on repeat, domineering the speakers with a brittle beat.




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Uranium Club – “Man is the Loneliest Animal”

Out on the tattered edges of punk Minneapolis’ Uranium Club sits chewing the glass that others discard and spitting it back at them as blood n’ bile rendered sonic. While Pere Ubu, MX-80 and Dow Jones & The Industrials left scattered shards of punk’s more frantic future to be ignored by the bulk of the movement in favor of a more melodic beast and greater accessibility, Uranium Club came and picked up the bent metal time signatures as their own. Their second outing for Static Shock launches out of the gutter with the greased rat chaos of “Man Is The Loneliest Animal,” a panicked jab into the collective ears of a less than wanting public. The song stumbles in unassuming, crouching, licking its wounds before slashing wildly and drawing blood hard and fast. Definitely don’t miss out on their upcoming LP, The Cosmo Cleaners.


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Lucille Furs – “Paint Euphrosyne Blue”

Chicago’s Lucille Furs trade in a meticulous vision of psych-pop, tied up in twills and doused in Marcus Keef’s saturated colors. Like many before them, they hold a reverent flame for the ‘60s, but they’re taking a lusher approach than many, as evidenced by the title track from their upcoming album Another Land, a ringing swinger that’s a testament to how they ended up with the equally psychedelic French label Requiem Pour Un Twister. For the album’s second single they continue their trip back through the ether, this time peeking out of the haze just a bit for a hip-slung shaker that’s basking in the sunshine with a carefree shuffle and a handful of tangerine harmonies and helium hung organ lines. The band’s been echoing The Black Hollies, Allah-Las and The Soundcarriers in the past, but here they add a touch of The Strange Boys and The Weakends to the mix. If its dreary where you’re hunkered, this little blast from Lucille Furs ought to brighten your day.



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The Stroppies – “Nothing At All”

Bummed that not enough people have been prattling on about The Stroppies, but that’ll catch up to them later. The band’s proper debut is out in March on Tough Love and the second single clinches the quality of this jangle-high strummer. “Nothing At All” sees co-vocalist Claudia Serfaty take over and the keys that permeated their previous single, “Cellophane Car,” take a backseat. There’s more than a little love for Flying Nun in the driving rhythms and a boundless energy that’s beggin’ to break free. Perfectly swung pop that prickles with life over a bittersweet core. If you’ve been sleeping on the short format releases the band has proffered up to this point, then its time to get familiar with Whoosh.

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