Browsing Category Tracks

Wyatt Blair – “Pop Your Heart Out”

Wyatt Blair’s power pop hockey stop Point Of No Return was a pleasant surprise from an artist devoted to outsized hooks and 200 SPF beach party vibes. So, it’s with equal pleasure that this one-off from Blair drops down into Volcom’s single’s cache as curated by Burger. The rest of the bunch is standard Burger fare, fun but not particularly bursting with fruit flavor. Blair, on the other hand, shows the rest how it’s done. “Pop Your Heart Out” is ten feet tall from the moment it hits and feels continuously like the epic finale of some sort of ’80s college film.

Somewhere between the bars John Cusack is finding resolve, Anthony Edwards is toppling the oppressive scowls of authority and/or Val Kilmer is filling some domicile with enough popcorn to burst a window. More likely though, I think Steve Guttenberg is smirking somewhere and just letting those guitars wash over him. That’s been Blair’s magic in his hi-fi incarnation, he knows just how neon to tint those guitars and synths. He knows just how huge the chorus has to be and then he aims higher. It’s pure cotton candy pop, but everyone likes a cheat day every now and again.




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Ball – “Speeding”

Subliminal Sounds cracks open the Earth to let the demon rock of Ball enter our realm. The first track from the Swedish psych/sleeze/proto-metal outfit sounds like someone jump started a time machine to take Timmy Vulgar back in time to front Deep Purple. Which, wait, hold on… can we do that? No, never mind, it’s unnecessary now that Ball are operating on a vomit rock frequency that’s straining its way through the speakers. This track is heavy and haggard, rough and psychotic with the right kind of power trio prog fueling their schtick. It’s a fun, sleazy romp the whole way through. Props to the nailed down ’70s rock simplicity of that album cover too. Can’t wait for the whole burrito of badness to arrive. Dig in!


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Mikey Young – “Socks”

Well, it should be no small secret that I love Mikey Young around here. The Aussie veteran of bands like Eddy Current Suppression Ring, Ooga Boogas and Total Control has gone on to be one of the country’s great mastering engineers and more than that, a litmus for great bands that bubble up from the underground. So, its with plenty of excitement that Young has a solo release of his own on the way. It’s not what I would have pegged or expected to be honest, but keeping us on our toes is what the man does best. The first entry in Moniker Records’ new synth series “Your Move,” it finds Young wading into bubbling ’70s synths that thankfully skew more to the Kosmiche than the Italo-horror side of the coin. He’s found himself in the midst of glowing Germanic tones, fluttering with a wide-eyed wonder and no shortage of head nodding beats. The series is intriguing and this is a great first entry to be sure. Check out “Socks” below:





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Premiere: Oister – “Lovin’ Me”

HoZac has been doggedly reissuing lost singles from power pop legend Dwight Twilley and this time they’ve got a real gem and true fan release on their hands. Pre-dating The Dwight Twilley Band, the pair of Twilley and Phil Seymour went under the name Oister around their stomping grounds of Tulsa, OK. They operated under this moniker from around 1967 until they broke through in 1975. The pair’s legendary ‘Teac Tapes’ contain recordings from this time period and they’ve yet to see release until now. HoZac Archival will issue Oister 1973-74 a double LP set of recordings from Twilley and Seymour before they shook power pop forever with “I’m On Fire.”

“Lovin’ Me” harnesses a bit of the same vein of dirty twang that their seminal hit taps, though it’s rougher with the band still finding their explosive footing. The track proves that both songwriters had plenty of chops from the outset. These were home recordings, laid to an early edition Teac four-track before accessibility made everyone a bedroom sound engineer, but they still sound remarkably crisp. The pair put these tracks down to tape and pressed the results to acetate to sell to friends and at shows. This era of the band is deserving of its own deep dive, and thankfully now these recordings have been shined up for power pop completists no doubt waiting to hear a clean copy. Check out “Lovin’ Me” below:


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School Damage – “Tall Poppies”

This one brings together members of two RSTB faves, Carolyn Hawkins of Chook Race and Jake Robertson of Ausmuteants. The group is self-admittedly going for a Vaselines meets Young Marble Giants sound, which on paper is an excellent idea that could go very wrong in execution. Thankfully the pair has the chops to pull it off pretty much perfectly. “Tall Poppies” hews closer to the Young Marble Giants side of that axis and they capture the stark, edge of electronic/edge of post-punk feelings with a deadpanned swagger that’s studied and superb. The track bodes well for what’s to come on their upcoming full length. If they can extend the exorcism of indie’s rise out of post-punk’s bones then it promises to be an intriguing entry in not only the Australian underground but also a welcome return to a sound that’s been explored far too seldom.




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Jefre Cantu-Ledesma – “A Song of Summer”

Very excited to hear a new cut from Jefre Cantu-Ledesma this week. The track is the first from his upcoming album, On Echoing Green, out June 16th on Mexican Summer. The track features vocals from Argentinian singer Sobrenadar and pushes Cantu-Ledesma’s needle slightly further from the crackled noise that he’d been engulfed in on 2014’s A Year With Thirteen Moons. That’s not to imply that he’s emerged totally from the din, there’s still a gauzy glow around the artist’s synth and guitar work, but this time it’s far less impenetrable, arcing closer to shoegaze than noise. The track bristles at the edges in waves of glorious energy and burns with a glow that’s quite like squinting into the sun. Cantu-Ledesma won’t be accused of making pop by any measures here, but fans of My Bloody Valentine may have found a new obsession in this one.



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The Myrrors – “El Aleph”

Arizona psych trio The Myrrors are back again this year, following on their intriguing LP, Entranced Earth from 2016 that raised their profile among psych heads everywhere. The new LP sees the band drift further from guitar psych and into dronescapes flecked with Eastern touches and their signature somber violin. The first taste from the upcoming Hasta La Victoria is a shamanistic shake through the valley of dessert psych, speaking well to their Southwest surroundings. It’s just a short wander into the scorched sun, but it feels like a ominous preview of the rest of what HLV has to offer. If you weren’t paying attention last year, then it seems Myyrors have doubled down on the urge to bend your ears to their psych prominence this year.




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Major Leagues – “It Was Always You”

Brisbane’s Major Leagues have been pumping out singles and short form releases that are packed with indie pop charms, but they’re now on the precipice of an album proper. “It Was Always You” heralds their upcoming full length for Aussie indie Popfrenzy, and it’s a swooning bit of jangle pop that’s got a bittersweet heart. A pitch perfect ode to lost love, the song pines in blurred hues that creep up between the tears on a warm summer’s day. The love may be over but at least something beautiful remains in it’s absence. This track piques interest for that full length for sure. For now though, just gonna hit repeat on this one a few times.




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Peacers – “Jurgen’s Layout”

Can’t help but love Mike Donovan around here, whether it was with Sic Alps, solo, or with Peacers. This time Ty steps out of view of the project, but Donovan tripled down on the ranks in his stead (math seems right). Adding to the fray is longtime RSTB favorite pop-in Shayde Sartin (Fresh & Onlys, Skyhigh Band, Skygreen Leopards) who always adds a bit of crackle to any band. The first taste of the oddly tittled Introducing the Crimsmen gives off a whiff of old Sic Alps for the lonely hearted. It’s typically sparse but coated in a layer of pop that’s entrancing and also just a touch menacing. There’s a hint of Skip Spence to Donovan’s songwriting, bolstered with an ozone riff and stormcloud sway. Put this one on the wishlist for sure. It’s a keeper.




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Mt. Mountain – “Dust”

I dug in on last year’s Cosmos Terros a bit, but Perth’s Mt. Mountain seem to have topped themselves with the stratospheric Dust coming out on Cardinal Fuzz in April. The title track is an epic knock into the drone/psych trenches. Building out of an insistent thrum married to high plains guitars, not too far off from Barn Owl territory, the band adds in some desolate flute that only enhances the apocalyptic feel of the track. This one ends up in scorched earth territory, as soon as the ominous clouds part, the chaos reigns. Mt. Mountain let loose with a six ton blast of sonic carnage that levels any qualms that the Aussies might not be stepping up to the task with enough firepower. The track doesn’t sustain gale force throughout, but teeters on the precipice of doom, making for an uneasy brilliance. Aside from the obvious hometown heroes in King Gizz, Mt. Mountain slot themselves in alongside Dreamtime in holding the psych banner high in the South Hemi. Having been ones to watch out for last year, the band graduates to necessary listening with this one.




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