Browsing Category Tracks

Elkhorn – “Electric One (Part B)”

Its been no secret around here that Elkhorn issued one of the year’s best LPs, but the pair proves that a towering achievement such as Sun Cycle/Elk Jam is only the beginning of a productive streak that takes them far into 2020. Cloistered with their friend and collaborator Turner Williams after a snow storm cut short that night’s show the three embarked on a lengthy improv session that resulted in two side-long flights of fingerpicked ripple, ozone-smeared electric singe and Williams’ meditative runs through electric bouzouki and shahi baaja. I’ve seen Turner work that bouzouki when he laid out some improvs with Jesse earlier in the year and it’s a sight to behold.

The result of these sessions is a record that burrows deeper to find the cosmic thread than ever before. As we are again encased in the sort of ice that birthed these pieces in the first place, it seems only fitting now to light this candle for all to see and shine it out into the world. This is Elkhorn finding the thread at the center of the universe and spooling it out into ribbons of psychedelia, spiritual jazz, meditative float, and Kosmiche. The Storm Sessions arrives February 7th on Beyond Beyond is Beyond.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

East Village Reissue on Slumberland

Slumberland is rolling out the essential reissues of late. Alongside their recent Springfields retrospective they’re reissuing a previously CD-only singles collection from late, great jangle-pop band East Village. The band showed up in these pages a while back as a Hidden Gems pick from James Hoare, but that album is only half the picture. The band’s album was released posthumously after they broke up on stage, but they’d left a catalog of singles up to that point that finally found a collective home on Summershine Records, but it has remained an ellusive pickup ever since its 1994 release. Great then to have Slumberland issue this on LP for the first time, giving the band another day in the sun. If you’re unfamiliar, I’d recommend letting James give a few reasons on what the band is all about or take a listen to a couple of singles tracks below.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Eric Osbourne – “Long Way From Home”

A sweet and soft spot from Fort Worth’s Eric Osburne prefaces his album out in January of next year. “Long Way From Home” is an airy folk wander that stops to linger a moment on the small details. Bolstered by a crack backing band that includes plaintive strings and features Angel Olsen on backing vocals, the song is sweet and could almost come off twee if Osbourne’s voice wasn’t lacqured in so much unspoken hurt. The track is packed with enough ennui to pin the listener to the floor – swooning and staring at the ceiling fain, letting the repetition of the blades blur the edges of the melancholy moorings that knocked the feet out from under you in the first place. I’m eager to hear where the rest of this goes, but for now, “Long Way From Home” seems perfect to keep on repeat until sleep takes away the sting of sadness.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Dragnet – “Man About Town”

Another hard-hitting punk nug from Australia, this time pulling together forces from several RSTB faves. Dragnet’s debut cassette dips into the boiled and buckled pool of fried-nerve punks rounding out time in Jarrow, Vintage Crop, The Floaties & House Deposit. Vintage Crop’s Jack Cherry lends his nasal pipes to the mix, throwing the songs in his bent tin turbine until they come out almost as freaked-out and fraught as the last couple of drops from the Crop themselves. “Man About Town” blows out the door with a sweaty signature before dropping down into a wrecked and unspooling midsection. The band plays at skirting the rails perfectly, always seeming like they’ll just tumble if they stop, so they go faster with a wildly confident gleam in their eyes that says they’re more than serious about skidding through the stops and letting luck keep ‘em from getting crushed by oncoming traffic. The tape’s gonna be a hard one to come by (50 copies) so swipe them quick or pick up that digital if you’re overseas. Anything coming out of the collective camp of these folks is damn well worth putting down the dollars.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Pedro Kastelijns – “Olhos da Raposa”

Got a brand-new cut today from Pedro Kastelijns, that captures the spirit of Tropicália and recasts it for a new age. The Brazilian songwriter melds ‘60s folk leanings with a deconstructed pop approach that’s broken and reformed. On “Olhos da Raposa” he lounges in the sway of his strings before they’re consumed by static and set adrift on a frequency of foam that disperses into the atmosphere. The songwriter lets his work be digested by the fray, glitching into cubits and twisting the tape into curls. It’s easy to see how he’s fallen in with the experijmental enclave around Boogarins, borrowing gear from the band to record his debut Som das Luzis over the last few years.

The song, inspired by an encounter with a native Brazilian fox called, “Raposinha do Cerrado” reminds me of a more refined version of reminds me of a more refined version of Columbian group Las Malas Amistates, though it seems an unlikely influence. Kastelijns pegs the origins of the track thusly, “I was really into ‘Dorival Caymmi’ eloquent voice and nylon guitar songs, ‘Claudinho e Bochecha’ sweet Baile Funk beats and some other weird sounds… I wanted to create a song that merged these two worlds. So I wrote these very different parts first only guitar and voice, then started building it up on Ableton, putting all these parts together and then making sure that I created bridges between them. It starts as a mess but then I go on figuring it out, cutting and pasting. I knew that the way I was playing the nylon would create some friction with the drum machine in a very pleasant way so I putted in the middle because I knew it would create a good momentum. It all goes with a lot of intuition, playfulness, experimentation and the confidence in some ideas that just sound right for you, and some friction also!” The album arrives December 6th from OAR.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

Continue Reading
0 Comments

Sore Eros – “Backseat Bop”

Long a favorite around here, Sore Eros is back with a sprawling new LP for Feeding Tube. The band has become a bit more spread out of late, which accounts for the five-year span between their last outing and this eponymous opus. Robert Robinson and co. start things off with the sunrise swells of “Backseat Bop,” a swooning, jubilant slice of pop that starts off slow and serene before exploding into a cascade of pop colors. Sore Eros has often captured a certain homespun psychedelic pop feel that warbles with a tender fragility, and that feeling is on prime display here. The song’s trepidation burns off, though, around the halfway mark, blowing out the walls of the bedroom in exchange for a widescreen, all-hands-on opener to their new album. The LP is out January 10th and features contributions from longtime compatriots Daniel Oxenberg (Supreme Dicks) and Kurt Vile. Good to have the band back in our arms again.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE or HERE.

0 Comments

Dhidalah – “Jovian Sky”

Some late-year treasures have been floating out of the Guru Guru Brain house at the tail end of 2019 and I’d advise you not to sleep on them. Following up on their stunning debut EP, power trio Dhidalah is back with a new album of face-ripped space rock that pulls from the Ashra and AMT ends of the spectrum in equal doses. Tuck into the winding and thunder-scratched “Jovian Sky” for a taste of the band’s heft. The song rumbles and ravages, brings the low-end and then dips into the quasar-quench for a cool down that’s necessary before your speakers start to singe. If you missed out on their last platter, the GGB logo on the cover should be more than enough to sway ya, but let this crusher be the cincher. The record is releasing next week on a short-warning schedule. Highly Recommended!

Support the aritst. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Scott & Charlene’s Wedding – “Back In The Corner”

Very nice to see Aussies Scott & Charlene’s Wedding back on the release schedule this year. After a three year break the band is back with a new EP, When in Rome, Carpe Diem and the first cut has them hip-swinging and pouting through their very best Velvets take. “Back in the Corner” is loose and strummin’, bringing out that Lou flair and swagger that they’ve hinted at prior and leaning into it wholesale this time around. Making songs feel like an effortless pop gem is what the band does best, but there’s some thing more malleable about their sound this time around. They’d always had a mussed hair quality to their songs, but this one feels like its got the coif greased and the leathers on. It’s a bit sinewier than their last couple of records. A real stunner that begs for the listener hear more of this EP. The record lands November 29th (so you don’t have to wait long) on Bedroom Suck.





Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

En Attendant Ana – “Words”

France’s En Attendant Ana swoon into the first single from their upcoming album Juillet, expanding on the pop sparkle from last year’s Lost & Found. Atop a pulsing beat, cut through with tensile synths, a cacophony of horns and thick guitar clouds, Margaux Bouchaudon’s voice saunters through a dream haze. The song recalls Stereolab at their most feverish, less serene noise flutter, and more brass-scratched belter. The band’s sound has come into focus, more polished than they sounded previously but no less biting. The new record was mastered with notable French engineer Dominique Blanc-Francard and is headed out January 24th, 2020 on Trouble in Mind.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE

0 Comments

Dire Wolves – “(Brother Lee) Womblife Blues”

Exciting news today as Dire Wolves announce another crusher for 2019. The band’s Grow Towards The Light is already a staple of the turntable around here, but they’re never ones to shy away from prolific output. Centripetal Force is putting the band’s I Just Wasn’t Made For These Set Times tape on LP. Not familiar? I don’t blame you. The release was previously only available as part of a 50-cassette run at the merch table on their last European tour, released by French label Ruralfaune. The release comes from the same fertile sessions that birthed Grow and Paradisiacal Mind and it’s rooted in much of the same meditative/explosive sensibilities that anchor their recent work.

On “(Brother Lee) Womblife Blues,” Georgia Carbone’s vocals transport the listener away from the physical world, leaving language bound to the Earth in favor of something more ephemeral. Like many of the Wolves’ compositions, Arjun Mendiratta’s violin elevates the track, sawing at the mind in sinewy swaths, while the battle between guitars and drums reaches a fevered pitch. There’s never a good reason to pass up on Dire Wolves vinyl, and this one’s probably not sticking to the shelves too long. The label’s putting out a run of 300, with 100 on sky blue. The pressing lands February 2020.


Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

1 Comment