Browsing Category Tracks

Le Villejuif Underground – “Since Everything Changes”

Ah man I’m slipping in my old age. France’s SDZ is a constant source of joy that I’d been remiss about checking up with, but this new slice of slackened and slumped pop via Le Villejuif Underground, who understandably know that their Velvet Underground worship is front and center, is a perfect antidote to what’s got ya down. The track is from their upcoming album for the veteran French label and it’s perfectly downbeat and shaggy, with mussed hair, rolling out of bed at three PM and wondering if it is, in fact a weekday. The band is headed by Aussie expat Nathan Roche and takes their name from the village of Villejuif in which they reside. There’s no shortage of bands that can’t get the Lou Reed monkey off their back but when you know how to inhabit those blues in a way that feels like a comfortable pair of shoes you’ve had all your life, then fuck if I’m the one who’s going to tell you that you can’t pull it off.


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Psychic Ills – “Baby”

Had you told me back in 2006 that the dark clatter of Dins would eventually beget a country album that features Hope Sandoval, I’d probably have laughed. Didn’t really seem the fit for Psychic Ills, who were playing basement shows that made the walls sweat with psychedelic ooze. Cut to a decade later and the band has followed their wits through a range of styles and psych country seems a good fit for them. “Baby” has a soft lilt that leans well and warbles ever so slightly in the summer air. Its a song that the band seems to make sound effortless, though its clear this is probably the most polished they’ve ever been. By the time the pedal steel seeps its way into the room, marbled and smooth, the track’s been cemented as a top earner in their catalog. With the first couple of dips into Inner Journey Out hanging around, I can’t wait to let this hit the table and soundtrack pretty much any weekend afternoon.




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Ignatz – “My Children”

Bram Devens has been a fixture around here for sometime, and whenever he ekes out a record under the Ignatz name, I’m always reminded of the simple charms that his records evoke. The first track from Ignatz’ upcoming record The Drain, on Kraak, is full of his signatures; the subtle hiss of tape, somber plucks and that high lonesome howl that Devens brandishes so well. The track is simple, but the weight and sadness that come with it hit pretty hard. This is a cleaner version of him than I’ve heard on his past releases and the direct approach is becoming for sure. This track bodes well for what the rest of The Drain has in store. Cant wait.



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Mind Meld – “Viper”

L.A.’s Mind Meld are digging in the same dirt as fellow West Coasters Ty, Feels and Wand. They’re mixing a thick froth of fuzz, riffs heavy as concrete and a desert heat waver of psychedelic slop. “Viper” is cut right out of the cloth of the Segall catalog, but its just as indebted to the heavy skull crushers of Blue Cheer, Sabbath and Hawkwind at their amp stacked best. The single is out on Permanent Records, who have also just moved themselves into cozy L.A. diggs, expanding on their lock on Chicago’s garage glory. If nothing else, I definitely want to hear more from these exhaust huffers in the future and something tells me there’s bound to be more smoke from this fire.




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Scott & Charlene’s Wedding – “Delivered”

In advance of a new album on Fire Records, Scott & Charlene’s Wedding have an EP with first single “Delivered” as its namesake and leading charge. The track’s an ode to home weed delivery and its a prime slice of jangle that crackles with urgency and fire. Its definitely a great omen of things to come if the rest of the EP / album are as furious as this cut. The band have long been a prime Aussie export who know that jangles don’t have to mean wistful, twee or necessarily pretty. They wield the strum like a hacksaw and they do it well. The EP’s out in June and album follows on later in the fall.



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Stef Chura – “Slow Motion”

Detroit’s Stef Chura brings a dose of grunge love to her half of a split tape with fellow motor city resident Anna Burch. Both halves of the tape were recorded by Saturday Looks Good To Me’s Fred Thomas and he contributes instrumentation to both artists’ tracks. “Slow Motion” has a scuzzed but sweet quality that recalls Colleen Green’s recent grunge revitalizations, though Chura’s got a tougher delivery by far and hits the 90’s grit dead on. Like Green, she knows what she likes and her flannel influences wear sleeve deep. This one bodes well for some more material from Chura and if the EP’s just a taste, I’m interested to hear where she’s going. There’s an album in the works, titled Messes so all ears on that when it comes out later in the summer.

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White Mystery – “Best Friend”

You know, I fell off the White Mystery train for a while. The eponymous debut burned, on Blood & Venom knew what they had going, but then it kinda slid for me. No hate, just sometimes you fall outta love. But I’m digging on their new track and its like old times. “Best Friend” has got a groove, and that groove is infectious as hell. Alex White’s still got the yelp and this has moved away from their typical garage power groove towards something looser; pounding keys, shuffling drums and White’s vocals just riding out the funk like it was an everyday affair. Hell, brother Jack knows that sometimes you gotta put down the guitars and pick up a piano to keep things interesting. I’ve always been a devoted lover of Get Behind Me Satan, maybe White Mystery are following suit, picking up the yoke and pushing to the barroom rollick that soothes the garage woes like a salve. I hope that the rest of this puppy simmers like this, that’s for sure.


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Wooden Indian Burial Ground – “Sad Mutations”

Portand’s Wooden Indian Burial Ground unleash a sophomore album via the Belgian label Exag and it makes good on a lot of promises that their 2012 LP spit forth. The new platter pushes bounds of psychedelic excess coming in at fourteen tracks of froth, spit and burnout fizz. The standout here is “Sad Mutations” a track that’s burning on the same psychotic jet fuel that Thee Oh Sees and King Gizzard have gotten into at their most frantic. The song’s full of high powered fuzz, dizzy organ and those yelps that that crack the sky and make you remember just why garage psych has the power it does. As much fun as the rest of the LP is, it would be great if it could all live up to the tease that this track lays down. The breathless beating of “Sad Mutations” is more than enough though to put them in good graces for years to come. Word is there’s a US pressing of the album in the works too. So that keeps more change in your pocket.




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Okey Dokey – “Wavy Gravy”

Nashville’s Okey Dokey have knack for time warped soul and on the first track from the duo’s upcoming Love You, Mean It they dig deep into the fifties skinny tie set, despite their pedigree in shaggy rock n’ roll. Made up of Aaron Martin and guitarist Johny Fisher of fellow Nashville band The Weeks, they also rope in some other local figures in their live band, including members of The Weeks, Sol Cat, Desert Noises, Diane Coffee, and Wild Child. On record though this brings to mind fellow southerners Magic Kids and their heartswell swoon and sunshine sweet delivery. There’s a touch more clouds in Okey Doke’s sky, but those patches of blue crack through pretty often.




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Honey Radar – “Caterpillar”

Following up on that righteous split on Third Uncle/Cunklet, Honey Radar are heading into a full length for What’s Your Rupture?. Still wading the murk between psych pop and faded 60’s garage stomp, this track’s got a hypnotic swirl and noxious chug that feels pretty right alongside your White Fence and Morgan Delt LPs. Though, it must be said, Jason Henn finds a lower slung swagger with less of an indebted pine to the past than either of those artists. “Caterpillar” stomps with heavy boots and a truly motorik heart, but it’s when the track gets lost in the smokescreen of Henn’s vocal FX that it brings the whole thing together to gel in its own swampy glory. Gonna need to hear more of this one, that’s for sure.




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