Browsing Category Tracks

The Buttertones – “Baby C4”

So The Buttertones have been lurking around for some time and always on my periphery, but I’ve chalked them up to the bin of bands that tick of a lot of my normal musical triggers but never seem to get it together in a way that excites me. I have to say, I’m making an exception for the first single off of their upcoming, Midnight in a Moonless Dream. “Baby C4” is coming on strong like a deleted Cramps outtake, if The Cramps had spent more time drinking with The B-52s. It’s not a rote bit of garage, but rather a snarling, slicked and flexing piece of rockabilly chocking down exhaust fumes and preening for a paycheck. I’m hoping this doesn’t end up an outlier on the new album, but rather an embrace of underbelly aesthetics that bite to scar.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE

0 Comments

Lithics – “Excuse Generator”

It’s been such an embarrassment of riches for wiry post-punk of late, from OMNI to Ganser, Total Control and too many more to name, there has been an upswing in the kind of crushed aluminum guitar stringers that sweat with nervous energy. I’m not gonna ask questions about what’s in the water, I’m just going to enjoy the pretzel bent singles that fall down each week. Following on an excellent bit of post-punk in the form of Taiwan Housing Project, Kill Rock Stars posits Portland’s Lithics as their next stellar export and first single “Excuse Generator” is a gem of chewed glass dynamics and nervous stomach nuance. Definitely gonna want to grip this one when it lands in May.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Wyatt Blair – “The Want To Be Wanted”

Wyatt Blair tackled ‘80s excess with a deft scalpel on his last album, finding a way to push Kenny Loggins’ towering tentpole radio hits to a place that was somehow nostalgic and quaint without feeling like he was trying too hard on Karaoke night. Now he’s on the verge of a new album and the first single is taking aim at another sweep of the ‘80s cinematic arm. Instead of guitar anthems that conjure visions of shirtless volleyball, caddy parties and repressed heartland teens, this time he’s taking aim at The Breakfast Club set. The latest single is packaging synthpop heartbreak into the kind of radio fodder that once buoyed Tears For Fears and Simple Minds with some new wave guitar slices that pull from the sheath of Echo & The Bunnymen or Modern English. Needless to say, I stand a bit curious to see if he continues this bent for a full album or if this remains an aberration on his style, but “The Want To Be Wanted” pulls off its trick nicely just the same.


Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

The Love-Birds – “Hit My Head”

SF’s Love Birds have been taking a trajectory conducive to my own heart here at RSTB. Following up a stellar first EP for Empty Cellar the band hooks up with longtime favorite Glenn Donaldson to mix their upcoming LP for Trouble in Mind. The first single from the upcoming In The Lover’s Corner jumps off of the jangle-pop springboard, built around curlicues of song that dredge up The Go-Betweens and The Chills, but ultimately it finds its own embrace of power pop as well. The song has DNA from early adopters like The Flaming Groovies and a tougher strain that brings to mind Matthew Sweet during his Bob Quine years. So, if you were to lob a dart squarely at the chart of influences that hook me in, Love Birds are smacking the center every time. Throw in a mastering job from Teenage Fanclub’s Norman Blake and a cover shod in block cut pastels and I’m pretty much sold. Gonna want to watch out for this one in May.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Unknown Mortal Orchestra – “Not In Love We’re Just High”

Admittedly, I dug the first single from Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s upcoming Sex & Food, it broke with some of the expectations that were hanging in the air after the success of Multi-Love and served as headspin for fans demanding more of the same. However, seeing how the band’s Stevie Wonder trapped in technology aesthetic is kinda filling a niche that’s not stuffed these days, I can sympathize with the head scratching / clamoring for some new nuggets of indie-soul shuffle.

The second track from the new LP strikes a contrast to both “American Guilt’s” bomb-about-to-blow pop aesthetic and the smartwatch disco of tracks like “Can’t Keep Checking My Phone”. It’s subtle, subdued, but still satisfies the want to sink your teeth into some head nodding nougaty goodness. The track falls into that quiet cool vision of the band that I’ve always had a soft spot for with the downtempo simplicity of “Not In Love We’re Just High” landing on par with the trojan-horsed earworms of “Necessary Evil” or “Secret Xtians.” What’s going to be interesting is how these two polar drops fit together into one album. Having been intrigued with the first, I’m only more eager for the big picture following this second taste.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Cable Ties – “Tell Them Where To Go”

OK I told myself I wasn’t going to gush about Cable Ties again but, c’mon, the band are back with a great new single inspired by their work with the Girls Rock Camp. The single is a goosebumps-inducing rocker that shoves the boys’ club in the corner and encourages girls to pick up and play with no mind to the detractors or nagging self-doubt. As usual the cornerstone of the track is Jenny McKechnie’s vocals, a weapon any band would be lucky to have at their disposal. Pretty much anything she’s singing about becomes a rallying cry, but in this case the subject matter and the system of delivery match in their buoyant blast. The track itself is amped up on chewed wire, spitting voltage in thick slabs through speakers and headphones alike. Much more than a stopgap single, this is exactly the kind of track that drew me to the band in the first place. It was available as an exclusive 7” at the band’s recent Cable Ties Ball, but should also show up in full form on Poison City as a digital single.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE/

0 Comments

Ganser – “Psy Ops”

After a string of solid singles and EPs, Chicago post-punks Ganser gear up for an album on No Trend and the first shot is a brutal paint-peeler full of shrapnel-tinged guitar and concussion blasts of bass. The song tears through the walls with the veracity of a leather clad Kool-Aid man. It’s a brittle, barbed, and insistent chunk of bile that feels like the tip of the iceberg in an album that’s bound to suck the light from the room and drop the temp a few degrees. Can’t wait to see how the rest of this on shapes up.


Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Bloods – “Feelings”

Been letting this one simmer for a few days but it threatens to blow hour by hour. Bloods have always delivered some great hooks swathed in a scrappy garage/indie vibe, but now they’re onto something more. They wormed their way into my heart back in 2012 and delivered a solid album two short years later, this week they rocket from outta nowhere after a pretty solid quiet period with their most overt pop nugget yet. Admittedly drawing on ’80s power pop / girl group gems like The Go Go’s, the track is glossy, almost tipping the scales too far, but not quite. It’s still got a belly full of fuzzed guitars and a sing-song chorus that’s probably best for shouting with the windows open and that’s about all you could ask for. In all truth this lands a bit closer to Transvision Vamp than The Go Go’s, and am alone in thinking that Bloods might tear up a cover of “Baby I Don’t Care?” Seems like they’ve got an album in the works and for a new U.S imprint no less (Share It Music). Consider me interested to see how they walk that edge, this feels promising, but I know that overproduction can go sour quick. Best not to overthink it though, for now this is a pretty solid bit of fun on repeat.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Vintage Crop – “Gerald Part 2”

Feel like I’m leaning hard on Anti-Fade lately, but I’ll be damned if they aren’t kicking out some choice gems from their stable of upcoming cuts for 2018. Vintage Crop, like labelmates Civic, are full of brutal punk slap, but they knot it up with the kind of muscular precision that made Eddy Current Suppression Ring perennial favorites here, and well, everywhere. “Gerald Part 2” sweats it out with the best South-hemi stranglers but veers to the frantically weird, which is always something I’ve found heartening about bands hanging in Ausmuteants’ orbit (the band’s Billy Gardner produces). Gonna want to keep the ears peeled for this one when it hits in April. Maybe stash away some lunch money until then to put this one on the table proper.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Altin Gün – “Tatli Dile Guler Yuze”

With unlimited access to a decent swath of the world’s recorded music and YouTube rabbit holes runnin’ rampant, it’s constantly possible to set your sights on a sound and make the most obscure vision your muse. With Khruangbin picking up the yoke of Thai funk and giving it a home in Texas, it seems just as likely that the ’70s Turkish psych of Baris Manço, Selda Bağcan and Erkin Koray, long held up by labels like Pharaway Sounds and Finders Keepers, should take root with a young group in Amsterdam. The first single from On is a dead ringer for the work of Selda, maybe with a touch of Hungarian psych goddess Sarolta Zalatnay thrown in as well and it scratches an itch for those driving ’70s Turkish psych and folk records that have been making the reissues rounds over the years. Following pretty quick on the heels of their great Spanish post-punk comp from earlier in the year, Les Disques Bongo Joe are proving that they’re a label making a name for themselves and worth keeping an eye on.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments