Posts Tagged ‘Mikah Wilson’

Mikah Wilson – “Sunshine Grooves”

Every once in a while and artist comes along that ticks all the boxes on some of my personal musical obsessions. For me, I have a deep love for bubblegum, sunshine psych, power pop and the bittersweet side of the ’60s that somehow leaves you sighing and smiling at the same time. Mikah Wilson has found a way to pack all of those things into one song that’s shimmering like a cloudless afternoon, but also leaves a pang of loneliness hanging in the air. The track echoes traces of collector bait songwriting team Gary Usher (Sagittarius) and Curt Boettcher (The Millennium, The Association) as filtered through the cartoon catchy workings of Rick Springfield during his tenure at Mission: Magic. Throw in a dash of Emmitt Rhodes’ buttery pop soul and I’m all but sold on this song. For fans of this type of glowing sunshine psych, Wilson has resurrected a sound with such precision that this already feels like it could slip right in between the stacks of old singles and fool the most ardent crate digger into thinking they’d stumbled onto a lost gem. I

Despite his label associations with Lollipop and Burger, Wilson works at a much more measured pace than many of his contemporaries, marking this as his third track in just about a year. It follows up on the sorely overlooked cassingle from last April that saw Wilson drop double power pop perfection with “Sweet Jules” b/w “Look At The Way”. Frankly I’m overjoyed for just this little bit added to the catalog, but the single track drop does leave one wanting much more. Though, if the quality of songs continue on this caliber, I’m willing to wait as long as it takes for an album from Wilson. They may be time-shifted works of sugary pop, but this, along with Wilson’s other two tracks are some of the strongest I’ve heard in a long time.




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Mikah Wilson – “Cassingle”

L.A. songwriter Mikah Wilson indulges in a brand of earnest ’70s pop that’s not removed from some prevailing winds (see Tennis, Weyes Blood, The Lemon Twigs, Tobias Jesso Jr.) but while he’s captured the crystal shimmer in the production, he’s also found a breezy simplicity that pushes him further from the Harry Nilson / Randy Newman / Joni Mitchell crossroads of ’70s FM. Perhaps that’s why the label is selling this as power pop and while there’s certainly a plainspoken appeal that hearkens to Big Star or Shake Some Action-era Flaming Groovies, it’s not saddled with the same lusty ambitions or tough/tender tension that either of those embody.

Instead Wilson is working from a sunshine soul that creeps into ’70s mainstream pop rock. Taking early Rick Springfield (talkin’ Mission Magic years here) on a lovelorn wander through the transistor wires, Wilson has created a vision of honest pop that’s echoing The Raspberries and Badfinger in the best ways. In every sense of the phrase, “they don’t make ’em like this anymore.” Wilson has wrestled mining the ’70s from the hands of hipsterdom, he’s gone feral in his wide-eyed sincerity. Both sides of this cassette are a genuine love-letter not only to those artists that laid their saccharine souls down all those years before, but to pop as a statement of purpose. On every level, I just want to hear more of this and soon.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

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