Posts Tagged ‘Italy’

Black Rainbows

I’ll admit it, I have a soft spot for Stoner Metal when done right. Too much sludge and it gets bogged down, too many blistering riffs and it hews too close to 80’s cheese, but when its that right mix of pounding drums and smoke thick guitar, fuzzed to hell and riding tempos like sand dunes into oblivion, then its perfect for blasting through the speakers on any given afternoon. Italy’s Black Rainbows are five albums deep at this point and offshoot band Killer Boogie throws down some serious riffs as well, so its clear that by now propulsive force Gabriele Fiori knows his way around the dank corners of 70’s metal worship. On his latest, Stellar Prophecy, there’s plenty of mile high guitars, stacked and smoking with the mix of Black Sabbath/Blue Cheer stomp that’s expected, but he’s gone the mile roping in the mystical qualities and prog instincts that charmed bands like Wolfmother into the hearts and minds of public consciousness back in the early aughts. For sheer the volume blasted swirling psychedelic bedroom warriors out there this is a perfect fit. This one’s for the blacklight poster set, hiding out and letting volume eradicate any of the day’s wrinkles and worries.




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Messa

This Italian foursome is picking up the yoke of doom and pulling the cart into the half light of a blood moon. The band’s debut Belfry on Aural Music is a crushing blast of apocalypse scented metal that’s given a bit of a reprieve from becoming leaden by the coven croon of their singer, who goes by the singular Sara. The band uses the term Scarlet Doom and that’s not off base, the guitars grind with the sulfurous heat of High On Fire and the opener “Alba” is straight out of the Sunn o))) tome of seismic ramble but there’s light in the mix and the vocals keep Belfry from sliding into the cavern of sludge that can sometimes earmark the genre. They have a crossover appeal to psych folk’s harvest rituals, though pushed into much darker territory. The band also seem to feel this kinship, citing a love for Pentagram and letting the closer, “Confess,” strip back the cinder smoke of of the rest of the album to just pair vocals and guitar for a quiet slide into the mire.

Messa kneel at the altar of doom metal but they don’t always stay, there’s plenty of heavy thrash on “Hour of the Wolf” that pushes tempos and knocks a few of the thunderheads out of the sky. “Blood” dabbles with woodwind and brass buzzes that dip even further into the psych-folk connection and tip into psychedelics as well. The band really is pulling from all edges and painting them black with doom’s influence, and that willingness to experiment makes this feel like a refreshing update on riff worship and self-serious hooded doom bands, not that the band don’t feel deadly serious in their incantations, they just feel like they have a richer well to tap.


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