Posts Tagged ‘Groove’

Horse Lords

Baltimore’s Horse Lords bring a constrained chaos on their fifth album, The Common Task. Built again on the hypnotic hurl of riff repetition that have cemented them in the halls of avant rock thus far, the band sets out to create one of their most cutting creations yet. The album opens with no pity, firing off heavy shots of guitar bounced through a maze of twisted glass tessellations on “Fanfare for Effective Freedom.” The song, tethered to the Earth only slightly by the lock-step rhythm section, is feeds melody and mechanics through the wood chipper and steps back to enjoy the spray. The tension on the song is shattered by the slide into the appropriately titled “Against Gravity,” which cuts that tether and slides into the stratosphere with some help from a humming sax and the celluloid slip of bass over the track. Its here that the band begins to make the album dig for blood. There’s still that hammerlock of repetition, but here the band begin to work the angles. Sax slashes from both speakers, the guitars still cycle into oblivion but it feels more dangerous and unpredictable. As the middle of the record looms, the band take post-rock punctuality and tie a tourniquet on the beat until it blackens.

Sharing a love for groove that begs some comparison to contemporaries like 75 Dollar Bill, the band tied together a work that’s diligently planned but still surprisingly unhinged. They delve deep into the tessellated inner workings of the spiraling mind. By the middle of the record the band push the listeners limits with the sonic scrape of “The Radiant City,” before diving again once more into the gnarled groove hammock of “The People’s Park.” The noise respite drives into bagpipe tones that threaten to slit the seams of the album before they interpolated Latinx funk with a political edged on the follow-up — a double punch that proves worth the wait. They cap the platter with a triple-sized dose that takes up 18 plus minutes on the flip, winding its way through simmering tones before smashing out the backdoor on a wave of Saharan funk and violin. The band’s been rightly heralded in the past for their precision and fire, and again they prove to be at the top of their class merging the desert, the basement club, the street corner, and the conservatory into one mindset shredded by an obsessive-compulsive chaos.



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Endless Boogie – “Jerome”

There’s a lot of music hitting the ears today, but its always time to stop and clear the schedule when a cut from Endless Boogie comes rolling down the wires. The band’s been sifting through some archival cuts over the past year, with the excellent and essential Volume I, II getting a reissue last year. This time the band embark on a split between fellow RSTB faves Weak Signal and they unearth an outtake from their 2010 sessions for Full House Head. Featuring a packed lineup with Eklow, Sweeney, and Malkmus all hitting their full guitar glory here, the song bites hard on the frayed wires of glam, garage, and nascent punk without a shred of concern for self-safety. Admittedly shooting for a hybrid clambake of Hawkwind’s tail pipe huffer “Urban Guerilla” and the dirtbag glory days of Flaming Groovies., the grove kicks in like Slade gone gonzo and the whole track is short through with Paul Major’s inimitable growl. Don’t miss, don’t delay. This slab’s so thick and sinister they probably had a hard time getting the petroleum to petrify into a solid state. It bubbles and oozes with a glorious mung.




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Garcia Peoples – “Heart and Soul”

The other half of this new Garcia Peoples platter found its way out yesterday and it’s a damn fine shade on them. Unmoored from the band’s usual groove, the flip to their epic One Step Behind finds the band whiskeyed down in the pre-dawn light, feeling out the bottom of the soul under the flickering bare bulb of yearning. Putting Derek Spaldo’s keys front and center, the song takes the band through country-scarred territory they’ve only hinted at before. The song dives into the large statement sadness of No Other-era Gene Clark in a way that most contemporary artists could only hope to scratch. While the band has cemented their status as kings of the stage — no matter how big or small — with this record they’re proving that the studio is just as much a home, and a place to carve out ecstatic highs and crushing lows that forever reverberate in their two-inch loop around the soul. If this one isn’t already on your wishlist for 2019, this damn well better seal the spot.



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Garcia Peoples – “Show Your Troubles Out”

2018 is proving to be something of a renaissance for the typically shunted “jam band.” The term inspires revulsion in so many, but to those with crisper memories of prime-era Dead shows there exists a pang for a higher level of improvisation than wading into the bottom rung puca necked garden variety jammers that clog up college campuses. To that effect, there are quite a few records that nail the good and scrap the bad connotations associated with the term (see One Eleven Heavy, Wet Tuna, Weeping Bong Band, and the return of Howlin’ Rain). Add NJ youngbloods Garcia Peoples to that roster. The band might not have the age range to have had firsthand experiences with the parking lot set but they’re clearly versed in the wealth of prime live boots that float around the internet and given the ability to hear the best of the best they may well have used them as a primer and style guide to the cosmic float.

The band has recently added P.G. Six on keys, who gives a further seal of approval (and enters into a contest with himself for excellent psych jammer of the year with his work in Wet Tuna). What works best about Garcia Peoples is that they feel unrestrained by the walls of the studio on their debut and that shines through on “Show Your Troubles Out,” a track deeply indebted to the groove and stretching out for the highline haze with each starburst jut of guitar that slaloms through the cut. Of course, this one has to have longer legs on stage, but it’s a damn fine argument for Garcia Peoples upcoming stunner on Beyond Beyond is Beyond.



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