Posts Tagged ‘Brazilian Psych’

Matt Lajoie on Lula Côrtes e Lailson – Satwa

Over the years Matt Lajoie has shown up here under many names — with psych folk searchers Herbcraft, alongside his partner in Ash & Herb, traversing folk under his own name, honing kosmiche waves in Starbirthed and Eastern enclaves as ML Wah. He’s back under his own name with one of the most blissful offerings in his vast catalog this year, but before that graces the waiting turntables, Matt sat down to pick out record that’s been lost to the ethers for Hidden Gems. Matt picked Lula & Lailson’s 1973 album psychedelic opus Statwa. Check out how this one came into his life and the imprint it left on him and his own writing below and nab a pre-order of the entrancing new LP Everlasting Spring.

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Pedro Kastelijns – “Olhos da Raposa”

Got a brand-new cut today from Pedro Kastelijns, that captures the spirit of Tropicália and recasts it for a new age. The Brazilian songwriter melds ‘60s folk leanings with a deconstructed pop approach that’s broken and reformed. On “Olhos da Raposa” he lounges in the sway of his strings before they’re consumed by static and set adrift on a frequency of foam that disperses into the atmosphere. The songwriter lets his work be digested by the fray, glitching into cubits and twisting the tape into curls. It’s easy to see how he’s fallen in with the experijmental enclave around Boogarins, borrowing gear from the band to record his debut Som das Luzis over the last few years.

The song, inspired by an encounter with a native Brazilian fox called, “Raposinha do Cerrado” reminds me of a more refined version of reminds me of a more refined version of Columbian group Las Malas Amistates, though it seems an unlikely influence. Kastelijns pegs the origins of the track thusly, “I was really into ‘Dorival Caymmi’ eloquent voice and nylon guitar songs, ‘Claudinho e Bochecha’ sweet Baile Funk beats and some other weird sounds… I wanted to create a song that merged these two worlds. So I wrote these very different parts first only guitar and voice, then started building it up on Ableton, putting all these parts together and then making sure that I created bridges between them. It starts as a mess but then I go on figuring it out, cutting and pasting. I knew that the way I was playing the nylon would create some friction with the drum machine in a very pleasant way so I putted in the middle because I knew it would create a good momentum. It all goes with a lot of intuition, playfulness, experimentation and the confidence in some ideas that just sound right for you, and some friction also!” The album arrives December 6th from OAR.



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Guaxe – “Onda”

Got a new video up today from Boogarins offshoot Guaxe, the duo of Dino Almeida (Boogarins) and Pedro Bonifrate (Supercordas). “Onda” is a sparkling psych-pop stunner full of blurred neon synths, fogged vocals and an insistent beat that pushes the song along with a hypnotic shake. The band’s named after the Gauxe bird that lives in the forests of Brazil near where the artist’s recorded, inspired by the bird’s otherworldly synth-like call. Definitely a track that should appeal to those in the mood for some downtempo grooves from Temples or offshoots of Beta Band, Lone Pigeon.

The band’s Pedro Bonifrate gives a bit of insight into the track and its homegrown video. “Onda” is one of the last songs we’ve recorded for the album, and one of the upbeat ones. Roughly it’s got me singing the verses and Dino singing the chorus, so you can hear us both on this one. The video was edited by myself with amateur footage from our gatherings in Paraty through the last 4 years, when the album was recorded. I guess it’s a nice way to show people some effective context about the Guaxe project, which was born from friendship and a true love for music.” The record is out September 6th from OAR.



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Piri – Vocês Querem Mate?

Far-Out Records digs up another gem in their series focusing on the catalog of Brazilian label, Quartin. The first recording of songwriter Piry Reis is a long lost psych-folk gem that flirts with Tropicalia, but winds up in much dreamier territory, touching into the Bossa Lounge vibes of Sergio Mendes dipped in a rosy pink glow. Heavy on flutes that roll out pastoral and languid, the album can’t help but conjure up humid summer afternoons and a gauzy vision of romance.

Though the artist achieved some amount of notoriety in Brazil, along with a majority of the Quartin catalog, his albums have fallen out of print and fetch a hefty bounty on the secondary market. The first of four albums that would explore the lush side of MPB (Música popular brasileira), Vocês Querem Mate? is one of those lost artifacts that’s more than just excessive crate digging. Fans of library funk grooves will have plenty to love here, as well as any post-Bossa collector’s looking to fill a hole in their collection. Absolutely loving these issues from Far-Out, worth keeping an eye on the entire series.


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José Mauro – Obnoxius

José Mauro’s masterpiece Obnoxius is a deep cut of Brazilian psych and melancholia that’s long been sought out in collector’s circles. Bolstered by mystery and an imposed mythic status due to the artist’s untimely death and/or disappearance shortly after the recording, the album itself was shelved until years after it was recorded. The record has loose ties to some of the other top tier Brazilian songwriters (Marcos Valle, Caetano Veloso, João Gilberto) but one listen through the singularly lush Obnoxius reveals the artist had his own way of capturing the heartstung glow of sadness that transcended those influences. The record is swimming in orchestration, subtly saturated voices and just a twinge of psychedelia.

Mauro emerged as one of the voices of dissent in Brazil during the military leadership of the ’60s, and his protest songs no doubt drew the ear of the government, adding another layer of mystery to his story. Unlike many of his peers, Mauro chose to stay in Brazil rather than emigrate during the time of artistic oppression in his country, and details remain scant as to whether a car crash did him in or he met more sinister ends. However tragic his personal details, this album stands as a promise of what might have been and what he left behind. Far-Out have put the long lost masterpiece back into circulation for those who don’t have the means to stumble onto a pricey original.

Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

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