Posts Tagged ‘’60s Psych’

The Holydrug Couple – “Vértigo/Valle de los Espejos”

Sneaking out on their Bandcamp this week, RSTB fave The Holydrug Couple have a charity EP set to benefit those wounds and affected by recent Chilean protests. Both sides of the 7” are covers from Chilean ‘60s band The Blops, who brought American and British rock n’ roll into the country — emulating The Beatles, The Doors, and other exports of the era, but interpolating their own native perspectives as well. Holydrug picks out two early cuts from the band focusing on a deep cut from The Blops’ debut album alongside a b-side from the ’71 single “Machulenco.” While both deviate from The Holydrug Couple’s usual deep valley euphoria, they present a nice take on the songs while drawing a line to some of their own influences. The single is being offered in a scant physical run of, or you can pick it up digitally on the band’s Bandcamp. Worthwhile to nab this one and spread some relief.


Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Caetano Veloso – S/T (Tropicália)

Not that the folks at Third Man don’t have wide ranging taste, but its not the enclave I expected to birth the first official version of Caetano Veloso’s eponymous solo debut. The man, responsible for the name of, and in large part the direction of, the Tropicália movement, moved from former child prodigy to art impulses with this 1968 album. Along with Gilberto Gil, Gal Costa, Tom Ze and Os Mutantes, Veloso was integral to the shift away from indigenous folk music and towards a larger psychedelic consciousness within Musica Popular Brasileira. Though Costa and Veloso recorded a duet album, Domingo, together in ’67, it wasn’t until the release of a pair of self-titled albums by Veloso and Gilberto Gil the following year that the movement would begin to take shape musically. The reaction wasn’t necessarily always to the welcome reception of fans, who objected to the shift away from folk. Moreso, given his and other Tropicalists’ critique of their military-led government, it was even less popular with the powers that be.

The album was aimed at becoming a cultural hinge-point, inspired by the open pop format of The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s. The record embraces traditional bossa rhythms, spoken word passages, heavy electrics, and a newfound interest in effects. The resultant album, though attempting to veil its political leanings in cheeky implications, drew ire as it grew in popularity. For as much ground as it broke in shifting traditions, it broke twice as much in emboldening and codifying youth culture against their own broken systems and American institutionalism. Eventually this would result in the exile of Veloso and his compatriot Gil.

The two performed on TV in 1968 and the ensuing uproar sent both artists overseas to London until 1972 when they were finally allowed return. There Veloso would work write and record the somber and superb follow-ups (also self-titled, but typically referred to by their first tracks “Irene” and “A Little More Blue”). As he returned Veloso would become the center of Brazilian pop for more than twenty years. This is, essentially where it began, and in many ways still some of his best. The record has been reissued several times over the years, but this is the first sanctioned US-pressed copy. As with any version, it is utterly essential.


support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Fapardokly – Fapardokly

California songwriter Merrell Fankkhauser touched down in severally ‘60s groups, beginning with the surf-bent Impacts before forming the psych group Merrell & The Exiles in 1964. The Exiles would eventually shuck that name to become Fapardokly. The thorny name was the result of combining letters from each of the members’ names, something that probably seemed a better idea at the time. The band held down a residency at the Pismo Beach venue The Cove while laying down songs over a number of years at Glenn Records’ founder Glen F MacArthur’s nearby studio. One of the tracks the band recorded, “Tomorrow’s Girl,” found its way onto Dick Clark’s American Bandstand, which helped turn their hodgepodge of studio tracks into an album for the hometown label.

Since it was recorded over several years, the style on the record evolves alongside the trends that transpired between ’64 and ’67. There are straightforward janglers, baroque ruminations and psych standouts peppered all over their eponymous LP. The record has found its way out before, but rarely in an authorized version. Sundazed worked out a CD a few years back, but this marks the return to vinyl and even boasts some archival photos and liner notes from Fankhauser himself. Its also returns the album’s original cover art, which had been degraded to lesser versions among bootleg issues of the record.

Though it would comprise his most essential recordings, Fapardokly didn’t mark the end for Fankhauser. He’d go on to have some nominal psych success with H.M.S. Bounty, a band that shared much common ground with later period Fapardokly. He’d wander towards a fractured blues in the ‘70s with MU, which saw him reconnect with Beefheart band member Jeff Cotton. Notably, Cotton was also briefly in Merrell & the Exiles, but wouldn’t become a member of Fapardokly proper. Nice to see this little gem back in print. Its probably not the most essential piece of the puzzle from the ‘60s but Fankhauser’s talent deserves a bit of a showcase. Well worth the time for Nuggets aficionados.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Mixtape: Children of the Sun

Now I know that I’ve explored softer psych on the very first mixtape, but it’s such incredible territory that it begs for at least one more. This time there’s less of an outright gloomy demeanor, touching more on the bittersweet melancholy that so many bands of the ’67-70 period were able to capture. Call it sunshine psych if you will and sit back into lush harmonies that usher in that twinge of cold in the air. The artwork is inspired by ’60s master cover artist Marcus Keef who had an uncanny way of capturing the spirit of psychedelia through film innovation. Tracklist and stream are after the jump.

Continue Reading
0 Comments

Twink – Think Pink

Twink, Pearls Before Swine, what’s gotten into 2017? The reexamination of excellent reissues of the outer edges of ’60s psychedelic music continues. The man called Twink (aka John Alder) was a founding member of such luminaries as The Pretty Things, Tomorrow, The Deviants, and The Pink Fairies. He then went on to form a very short lived band with Syd Barrett in the post-Floyd years (Stars). Twink’s tenure in The Pretty Things lasted through their S.F. Sorrow days, but he left before the release of Parachute. It’s following this period that he recorded Think Pink with members of what would become The Deviants alongside rogue members of The Pretty Things and Steve Took of Tyrannosaurus Rex.

The album, though commercially released, was really a warm up for the coming of The Pink Fairies. Members Mick Farren, Twink and Steve Took along with the addition keyboardist Sally Meltzer would form the original (though not album version) of that band. Twink’s lone solo outing would, however, exemplify his standing as one of the lights of the UK underground rock scene. He was known, as many at the time were, more for his stage antics than his adept playing. Still he managed to know the right people and work the right angles to become integral to the core of ’60s psychedelia. As such Think Pink is full of indulgently chugging riffs, glorious fuzz breakdowns and effects touches for ‘the heads.’ It’s about as quintessential a snapshot of the frayed edges of that scene as could be captured.

There are no singles on the LP, there’s nothing that’s overtly catchy about the album and while that might be construed as a commercial weakness in hindsight it ends up its strength, feeling more on the pulse of what might have been working in clubs than what’s often known as canon of the period. This new reissue reinstates the original mono mix that was intended for Decca’s release. Bound to run out to the most ardent collectors, but it’s a great curio of the time for sure. Recommended to pick it up if you can! \




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

John Wonderling – Day Breaks

A long kept secret of lost classics, John Wonderling’s debut LP was ill fated from the start, despite boasting a deep bench of session players. Wonderling made his mark as the writer of “Midway Down,” a song made famous by The Creation. Though, The Creation don’t always find themselves in constant conversation these days either (see their much needed retrospective on Numero this year) they raised Wonderling’s profile at the time and he released a single version of “Midway Down” backed with “Man Of Straw”. What truly halted Wonderling’s momentum was taking the next five years to craft Day Breaks, an album of subtle beauty, but slightly faded psychedelic pop for its release in 1973.

The single was the last independent release on Loma Records, which was then absorbed into Warner Brothers. His album would wind up on Paramount. The shift to major label should have seemed like a blessing, but the label simply didn’t know what to do with Wonderling. He’d languish and most of the records printed would disappear, with as few as 10 copies being reportedly making their way to distribution. As such this has become a pricey collector’s property. The record shouldn’t have been as hard a sell as it’s often described. Though songs like “Man Of Straw” seem a bit past the mark, the rest of the album delves into the kind of wistful ballads that wound up making legends (albeit not always in their time) of artists from Nick Drake to Gene Clark.

Wonderling, too should be higher up the ranks of lost songwriters and it seems that this reissue from Flashback is aiming to make that so. Though only on CD for now, the new issue rounds up the entirety of Day Breaks along with the A and B-side versions of “Midway Down” and “Man Of Straw” with a couple of unreleased demos. This is an all too brief, but truly wonderful album finding a new life.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Mixtape: Hurry Sundown

I’m introducing another new feature today on the site, a series of archival mixtapes. I’ve always been a fan of the mixtape idea, as perhaps any child of the ’80s and ’90s might be, but rather than simply a playlist or rundown of current favorites I’ve decided to dig up some themes from the past. In Autumn, when the temperatures seem to be dipping and the weather’s a mix grey skies and copper sun streaks, I often go to the well of ’60s psych, though its not the fuzz guitars and bright pop I’m usually looking for. There are some songs from the psychedelic wave that touched a more bittersweet note, reveling in a sad, quietude that matches the changing seasons. The first mix is called Hurry Sundown (after the Bubble Puppy song, though Hawkwind’s “Hurry On Sundown” also captures the mood). Hopefully this hits you right and lets you in on a few excellent soft psych classics. Tracklist, stream and download after the jump.

Continue Reading
3 Comments