Posts Tagged ‘Luke Schneider’

Nashville Ambient Ensemble – “Conversion”

A wash of relief floods the field with the first cut from the debut of the Nashville Ambient Ensemble. The record was brought together by composer Michael Hix, roping in some of the city’s best to add textures to his embryonic dose of cosmic country. The assembled players include Cynthia Cárdenas, Timon Kaple, Deli Paloma-Sisk, Kim Rueger, Jack Silverman and RSTB fave Luke Schneider on pedal steel. “Conversion” wafts in on a wave of euphoric steam, fogging the foreground with shifting synth and aqueous guitars that seep through the senses, radiating golden hues across the synapses with each progressive moment. The textured vocals dart through the mists unseen, feeling everywhere and nowhere until the song simply retreats back into the air. Hix’s ensemble pull an unseen weight from the mind and body, loosening the nerves with each second on their upcoming LP for Centripetal Force. The LP, Cerulean arrives on March 19th, and I’d recommend letting it find a way onto your speakers.

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Luke Schneider

This week’s been on a mercurial kick and I say why bump the tiller now. This record from Luke Schneider reinvents the Pedal Steel as force for ambient float and it’s an absolutely stunning take on the instrument. While the steel has long been the secret weapon among the cosmic country fare cropping up here, and even found its way into the minimal stretch of the Ezra Feinberg release from yesterday, Schneider elevates the form. He gives the instrument its due as a focal point while all but rendering the sounds unrecognizable as they’re refracted through the psychedelic and new age prisms at either end of his spectrum. Solo pedal steel can often be showy, and can flirt with melancholia and comedy, but Scheider pushes the past aside.

While the instrument has a grace and some might say its the heavy heart that adds a mournful edge to country, its also a virtuoso’s tool. Luke’s had a history of unconventional use, but a breakthrough into sobriety and a steady diet of ambient in the headphones lead to an unconventional, yet stunning record that’s more indebted to Laraaji than Herb Remington. There’s a fragile ebullience to Schneider’s work and he’s made a record that’s as complex in temperament as it is stark in aproach. The sounds here resonate with the humors of the soul, stirring euphoria in the same way his instrument typically divines sorrow. Peace and calm radiate from Luke’s compositions as if the balance of the universe rested on his slide.

When he’s not crafting crystalline tones, Schneider has been a constant in alt-country circles playing with Natural Child and Black Lips before a change in life direction and higher profile stints backing Margo Price, Orville Peck and William Tyler. He continues to work as one of country’s leading sidemen — never the most technical player, but a unique force that allows him to continually put his stamp on his recordings. Here he proves that he’s more than a key element in an ensemble and that pedal steel can float as far as the synths into the edge of the cosmos. This one’s a 2020 essential.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

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