Posts Tagged ‘Kurt Vile’

Kurt Vile with John Prine – “How Lucky”

I’m sure I won’t be the first to tell you about this one but KV’s always held a soft spot in my heart ever since some basement shows back in NYC so many years ago. It was worth waiting until deep into the morning then and its worth flagging this excellent collab with John Prine for his upcoming EP. Can’t even imagine Vile collaborating with an American legend back then, but here it sounds so natural with the both of them taking on Prine’s “How Lucky.” Speed, Sound, Lonely KV wraps up a few covers of John Prine and “Cowboy” Jack Clement as well as two originals — and was recorded with Nashville with session notables Bobby Wood, Dave Roe, and Kenny Malone along with with Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys) and Matt Sweeney (Chavez, Superwolf). Hearing Prine here, sounding as natural and weathered as always just makes this year’s loss harder to take, but this curio from Vile is a reminder of what made him an indelible voice in American songwriting. The EP is out October 2nd from Matador.




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Farmer Dave Scher – “Ocean Eyes”

Been a while since ‘Farmer’ Dave Scher popped up on my radar, but for a good swath of time he was a constant around here from Beachwood Sparks and All Night Radio to The Tyde for a stretch. He’s lent instrumentation to a good couple of dozen more than I can count and he’s swept back into view with The Violators and The Skiffle Players lately, but now he’s back with his first solo songwriter works since his ’09 LP and 7” for Kemado/Mex Sum. While the cosmic folk, gauzy psych, and earthen country remains, there’s a renewed focus on breathing life back into a dying planet its all swept into a dizzying whirlwind of reverberating sound on “Ocean Eyes.” The song’s got a heart that has one hand in the glorious cacophony of Akron/Family and another cradled around his compatriots in Mystic Chords of Memory. Though the tethers don’t keep this one locked anywhere for long — a chorus of voices rises and falls, waves crash, and circular piano swims around and around the song with a comforting cadence. The EP features drop-ins from friends Kurt Vile, Cars McCombs and Dan Horne and it arrives October 2nd on Spiritual Pajamas.



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Mike Polizze

With slight exceptions, the prior works of Mike Polizze have tended to center on volume, gnawing at the air until the oxygen is burnt and a char lays over the scene. His first entry to the amplified atmosphere came via Birds of Maya — blistering paint and eroding eardrums through releases on Holy Mountain and Richie. A left turn towards the garage with a touch of pop as Purling Hiss didn’t turn down the turmoil in the early years, letting feedback fight the tape hiss for prominence on initial releases before beginning to edge towards a classic rock sound that’s been more refined. In a lot of ways Polizze’s been following the same trajectory as Ethan Miller’s slide from Comets on Fire to the slipstream sheen of Howlin’ Rain. With a new run under his own name Mike’s stripping away the electric grit altogether, though, and letting the warm amber glow of late October firelight color his folk-pop with a particular nod to his Philadelphia surroundings.

Hunkering down with fellow Philadelphiles Kurt Vile and producer Jeff Zeigler, and letting the results out on Paradise of Bachelors, this is the sound of Philly transplants growing easy into their next phase. The pure joy of it comes through in every fiber. The stamp of Vile is particularly present on the album and he lends vocals to quite a few of the tracks here, with Polizze stepping up and delivering on his own version of Vile’s hammock-swung porch vibes. The record cools the swamp of summer into the sweater-hugged nights of fall from the moment the needle hits the platter. In fact those feeling an ache for a new Vile LP would be wise to see this as a stop-gap gift from the songwriter as it feels almost like an even collab between the two at times. Even hidden in the haze, Polizze had a handle on songwriting that made it stick, but here with the volume twisted down, he’s proving that he’s got hooks and grace to spare. The record is a departure for the songwriter, but it feels like a natural shift that could spawn the next phase rather than an outlier among the fuzz.





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Mike Polizze – “Cheewawa”

Another sunbaked strummer from the upcoming solo LP from Purling Hiss’ Mike Polizze. Like the previous single “Revelation,” there’s an inherent looseness, a sonic hammock of sound that cradles the listener. Its easy to pair Polizze’s solo work with slight breezes and the green sunlight that filters through the trees. Early summer solitude is a perfect pairing with his laconic strums and the burlap drawl of guest Kurt Vile. Naturally videos in isolation are getting hard to inject too much creativity into, but the hazy aura here does nicely to compliment “Cheewawa’s” natural ease. The record’s coming our way July 31st on Paradise of Bachelors.



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Mike Polizze – “Revelation”

I love it when a track comes in that I didn’t know I needed, but once its in the headphones the resolve is instant. It should come as no surprise if you’ve been crawling through the Raven feed over the last few years that Purling Hiss is always on the turntable, but now Mike Polizze turns the hiss down to a hum and lets his soft side shine through. With fellow Philly luminary Kurt Vile in tow, he shapes this track into an azure swoon lit on clear skies, yet burdened with a slightly heavy heart. While some similarities might arise with his recording partner, Pollizze finds his own faded grace in his new digs, shaking off the yolk of fuzz for a surprisegly clear view of pop that’s littered with strums, horns, and sing-along choruses. The album finds him on indie-folk outpost Paradise of Bachelors and heads this way in July. Gonna want to mark the calendars and get this one prepped to pop on repeat pretty soon.



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Sore Eros

The histories of RSTB and Sore Eros are fairly intwined. A long running fixture on the site, the band also graced the first show ever booked under the banner of RSTB at Northside festival a million years back. So, its only fitting that as the band releases their swan song it should wind up here. Robert Robinson has been holding the spark, but the band drifted to different coasts and doesn’t find themselves working live so much any more. Enter engineer/producer (and the force behind The War On Drugs) Adam Granduciel, who was able to coax the band’s distant members back into the studio for a fitting sunset on the band. The band simmers in a brand of soft-focus psych — part folk’s whisper, part hypnogogic shimmer, and here, part sun-kissed West Coast foam rolling back out to sea. The low-light linger adds a nice touch to sound and gives the whole record a relaxed nature that reverberates calm and coolness.

The record orbits around the ten-minute plus roil of “Ocean Tow,” an unusually extensive cut from a band who usually keeps things in the pop song range. The stretch works and they slide down the movement chute as the track folds and unfolds itself in billowing layers . Floating around the centerpiece, the band pings through the echoplex quasars, feeling out the foam with a bittersweet bent. Though this may be their last, the record makes a strong statement of purpose for Sore Eros. They were never at the forefront, but for those that dug into their tender psychedelic heart, it was a welcome journey.




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