Posts Tagged ‘Dirtnap’

The Hussy – “Coast”

After a few great side hustles (Proud Parents, Cave Curse) Bobby and Heather are back in the saddle as The Hussy and by the saint’s of the garage gutter, a new LP is on the way from Dirtnap this fall. The band bursts out of the gate with album opener “Coast,” a track that’s steeped in the popped-vein psych-punk that’s wound up the hallmark of their sound. The pair hand vocals back and forth along their records but this one’s a true Bobby thrasher — nervy, fried, and collapsing to the floor by the time the the track tumbles to a close. They’re slicing the skin and inserting just a touch of itchy sci-fi punk creep this time around.

Damned if this record isn’t poised to be among their best. Bobby’s spent a lot of the interim backing up Nobunny as a sideman and he’s bringing quite a bit of that manic, whirlwind energy with him here. Add in some great lost Jay Reatard vibes and this one’s hitting the spot. A lot of bands that shot out of the garage-punk gauntlet of the early 2010’s have sought to sand their edges and spit-shine their sound, but The Hussy remains a dirt-caked fireball of fury, proud of the crust under their nails and ready to scratch you with them if need be. Madison’s never been a hotbed of hype, but every time there’s a new Hussy LP, I think that maybe it should be.

The Looming hits shelves September 27th. Be ready.

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Martha – “Love Keeps Kicking”

Another great track from UK punks Martha lands today and with it the news that the band have an album on the way in April from Dirtnap. As with the previously released “Heart is Healing,” the song tackles the heartbreak that seems to be the core of their new LP. The band’s grip on power pop is as deft as ever and, while not quite as anthemic as “Heart is Healing,” they’ve still got great handle on a hook and a indominatble spirit for charming as hell indie-pop. The accompanying clip sends up ’50s monster movies with a black n’ white on a budget / Ed Wood vibe that keeps the whole thing silly from the start. Looking forward to the album when it drops on April 5th.

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Martha – “Heart Is Healing”

I dug Martha’s last album of emotionally raw power punk, but came to it late, making me feel like I’d been missing out until that moment. The band picks at the bones of pop punk but adds a heavier hit with touches of Ted Leo in their DNA and a jangle splattered twang that belies their UK roots. This time I’ve vowed to pay attention and it seems to have paid off. On their way to what I’d hope is an announcement for LP3, the band has offered up a new single and video for the strummy, knotty, and as might be expected, emotionally fraught “Heart Is Healing.” The video is a dizzy, homey shot of the band lounging, but it lets the song stand out as the focus here. The track lands among their stronger singles, hinged on a hook but letting some slippery slide work smoothe the edges on those jangles. Its a damn fun ride and hopefully a herald of new works to come.



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Mind Spiders

Heading into their fifth record Mind Spiders are dispensing with much of their garage trappings (what little remained) and plunging headlong into full dystopian synth-punk. They’ve long been lingering around the sound but with an embrace of drum pads and prominent placement on those hornet-buzzing keys, their transition is complete. The sound is cold and caustic with just the right strain of dark nihilism pumping through its veins. Though they’d do well to look to fellow synth-punks Ausmuteants for a course in how to make this strain of future punk sound just slightly unhinged, giving it a double dose of wild-eyed prophesying and tin-hat menace.

Furies, it would seem, revolves around a return of the old gods to reign down their displeasure on humanity, doling out their wrath in supernatural waves via synth squelch. Given their old-world inspiration the band could easily start reaching for Iliad inspired lengths. They opt for brevity instead, however, kicking this thing in just over 30 min. It seems the new uprising isn’t spiraling out to prog-rock time tables just yet, though they seem willing to try in the future, if the 8+ minute closer is any indication. All around, another solid offering from a band that’s too often billed as what Mark Ryan did after Marked Men. They’ve long since come into their own and are figuring out how to carve their icy negativity into barbed anthems. Here they’ve come as close as ever to nailing the formula.


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Mind Spiders

Mark Ryan’s made plenty a name for himself with his work in Marked Man but as the years wear on he’s building an equal reputation for Mind Spiders. Running on an engine of sneering and searing new wave, propulsive with an evil glint in its eyes, Mind Spiders sit well in company with the twitchy latter day hijinks of Hierophants and Andy Human. Its nice to see the garage boys grabbing keys and chewing tinfoil until the riffs bleed and in the case of Mind Spiders they tend to bleed a disturbing blue-green that hints at something plenty sinister below the surface. The sci-fi vibes run rampant and that’s the way some of the best new wave and post-punk should work, I love a band that gets nerdy for nerdy’s sake while keeping it catchy. There are only eight tracks here but the band leaves you breathless by the time the last track clicks to a close. Its been a good run indeed up to where they stand today but Prosthesis is the strongest set yet from the Spiders.




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Phylums

A nice stab of garage goop out of Milwaukee, dubya eye. Phylums tackle the garage rock canon, launching through three chord wonders and doubling down on the Nuggets psych touches, swirling organs and some dark clashing guitars find their way into the mix n mire. They tend to brush aside the usual carefree fare of relationships and big dumb fun that often act as fodder for their respective genre, instead delving deeper into an alienation and desperation lyrical cycle that adds a measure of depth to their initially foamy churn. Though it doesn’t get dire by any means, no no, the band turn their dismay at monotony into fun for the whole family and Phylum Phyloid sits well among their Dirtnap peers as a bit of candy pop that crests well out of the speakers of the dodge on summer days. Hell there’s even a ditty about speech therapy. How can you say no to that? More down and dirty punk for the denim set.

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