Posts Tagged ‘Dirtnap Records’

The Hussy

Wisconsin’s finest, The Hussy, have been holding down the garage gamut in the Midwest for years now and they’ve consistently churned out a string of albums that synthesize sweat into fuzz-crusted hooks. Their latest, Looming, is more fodder for the fans who’ve already made them staples of the listen list, though it should entice any diehard of dinged and damaged garage in 2019. Bobby and Heather expanded their sound a bit on Galore and Looming finds itself a natural sequel to that hook-slinger. The guitars still grind, the drums pop n’ punish, and the vocals whip back and forth between the pair, with Bobby giving his tracks a nasal hammer that’s heavy and hurtin’ while Heather softens the blow (just a touch) with some smolder and soul. Though, she can bring just as much invective to a track as her counterpart to be sure.

The record culls in some new sounds, with flutes tickling the underbelly of “Sorry” but they make their biscuit from the overwhelming abundance of fuzz n’ rumble that they kick up over the course of 27-minutes. The band recently spent a tour opening and acting as backing band for Nobunny, and the experience doesn’t seem to have been lost on them. They channel a good dose of the feelgood recklessness that the Bunny has always captured into their new set, proving that they were perfect choices for the job all along. There’s been a slight shift away from the snotty punk vein with a heart of gold that was long being flayed by Jay Reatard prior to his tragic death and has been constantly caved at by Ty Segall, but The Hussy place themselves in the same school as both of these artists, finding the axis between pop and pummel and making it sound good. If you’re not down with The Hussy, you reconsider some life choices. Looming is a Midwest ripper to the core, and endlessly entertaining on each new listen.




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Martha

Jumping up another rung from their superb and well-received sophomore LP Blisters In The Pit of My Heart, UK power pop shakers Martha are proving to be the piners to keep a constant eye on. The band’s latest infects 2019 with the kind of hearsick stomach ache that accompanies lost loves, long nights, dour days, and the terrible creeping feeling that you’ll never survive the next couple of months unchanged. Despite covering some of the bands most heavy territory, they make go down pretty easy, swishing down sweet hooks garnished with singalong swoons and whoa-oh choruses that help mask the bitter poison swimming below the in the band’s lyrics. While the hooks are noting to slough at, the band’s bare and bracing subjects elevate them from slipping into the punk undertow.

They’ve always had their hearts on their sleeve, tugging gently at the emotional tags that can sometimes be a brush off for folks. Yet they knot their wordy wallows into decorative lanyards that can’t help but win over listeners with the shared trauma of youth. Every song in Martha’s canon feels like they’re barely getting out alive and its hard not to nod along -whether the listener’s in the throes of high-stakes youth or just moisturizing the scars from it as part of a daily routine. The band is the embodiment of bittersweet, begging the listener back for more with earworms that nod the head but rub the soul raw.

To build those earworms they’re pushing aside the prattle of punk’s latter-day indulgences, keeping in the parachute lite pop billow, but discarding the repetition and cheeky charms. They supplant these with a touch of jangle stripped right out of the English tradition and the wistful cool that comes in tow with their clouded demeanor and introspective bend. While Love Keeps Kicking is easily a record that could facilitate any windows-down car trip for the summer, its just as likely to find you pulled over by the roadside crying off old wounds. For every tear they spill, though, Martha’s there to wrap an arm around and wipe it away. The record is knife and stitches all in one and despite my best intentions, its hard not to listen, lash and repeat.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

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