Posts Tagged ‘Charles Moothart’

CFM

On his second solo album as CFM, Charles Moothart distances himself further from his closest collaborators — shying from the glam-garage punch of Ty Segall and the more metallic slap of Meatbodies. CFM carries a lot of the same DNA, though, so its not entirely shod of the shadow of Segall and co. just yet, but Moothart comes into his own with some tender tugs at the heart and some psych burn that dabbles in shoegaze fizz. The album opens with a few burners, proving he’s got his own heat at the ready. “Black Cat” and “Sequence” tussle with hot tar licks, and “Street Vision” slows the choogle to a steady swagger, but its not until the wound opens for “Green Light” that the album shows what Moothart has at his disposal. The track’s fraught with menace and pain but also an open woundedness that’s not often seen in his particular pack, save for maybe Mikal Cronin.

He returns to the fray for a few more songs, and pulls it off with a more than serviceable acid burn, but he returns to the raw nerve on the album’s title track, “Soundtrack to an Empty Room,” which makes a double case for Moothart to dispense with the amplifier fry altogether and explore a full album of guarded bloodletters that aren’t at all interested in proving his weight in riff returns. Likewise the stately sway of “River” gives the second side a shove towards transcending his roots. There’s plenty to love for the buried needle brigade here, and I’m all for the fuzz, but there’s also an inkling of where Moothart might be headed. I’d say if he can go all in on the tender trappings, he might just have a stunner on his hands.



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GØGGS – “Pre Strike Sweep”

Whew, lotta news today and all of it good. Adding to a busy year with a solo record and collaboration with White Fence already under his belt, the inexhaustible Ty Segall jumps to sideman with GØGGS. The band’s sophomore LP for In The Red comes prefaced with a caustic blast of volume-shredded punk. Frontman Chris Shaw (of Ex-Cult) brings the heat, same as the band’s debut, but this time there’s more than just roadburn riffs. Augmented with some spaced synths, this one comes on like Hawkwind gone hardcore and its a brutal slap to the collective jaw. The full LP drops in September and if its half as full of crushed glass and airplane glue as this track, then we’re all in for a treat.


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CFM

Forever intertwined with the careers of Ty Segall and Mikal Cronin via his rotating stages of collaboration with both, Charles Moothart strikes out with his second solo album, a delightful chunk of fuzz and rumble that echoes the best bits of both those artists. A stride away from the heavy stoner antics of his most well-known turn in Fuzz, Dichotomy Desaturated tumbles through the fields of Sabbath, then touches up the riffs with a faded photo memory of glam left in the sun. Moothart has certainly been picking his way through Ty’s T. Rex collection, and he adds a touch of that acoustic nuance over the top of these garage-psych gems, but it’s clear that his tenure in Fuzz is no incidental brush with the gods of ’70s proto-metal. He’s picking through the full gamut of sludge lords here, from Flower Travelin’ Band to Blue Cheer and on through Leaf Hound.

He’s at his best, though, on the mid-tempo slow jams, reveling in a slower pace and perhaps a catch of breath from the frantic energy he’s so often embroiled in. On “Voyeurs” he takes the tempo down to a simmer, but finds plenty to chew on in the song’s leathered swagger and smoke curl cool. Elsewhere “Desaturated” floats through an intoxicated haze, stumbling charmingly with a cocked smile and an air of late night isolation. In the end though, Moothart’s ability to stuff a fuzzed riff full of catchy catharsis seems to win out. He shows off his amp-fried freakouts over the majority of Dichotomy’s red-lined territory and he’s an admirable wall shaker, as usual. Something tells me though that Moothart could be the one to crack onto the perfect distillation of Sabbath’s softer side. I’ve always felt that someone needs to make a record that splits the “Planet Caravan”/”Solitude” axis and then just runs it down both sides. The seeds are here, and that’s enough to keep me listening.


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CFM – “Rise And Fall”

2017 appears to be the year when the members that have made Ty Segall’s backing bands so potent get their own shared glow of the spotlight, and deservedly so. With Meatbodies heading up the glam-psych concept album and The Cairo Gang shined into pop prettiness, it’s left to Charles Moothart to lift the garage baton high and get into some dirty riffs. The first taste of the band’s upcoming LP on In The Red is the tar-thick garage-pscyh stickiness of “Rise and Fall.” The recording here, like Moothart’s compatriots in Meatbodies, takes a notch up from the shredded psych salad he’s released in the past. He has West Coast studio wizard Eric Bauer and old pal Segall to thank for that, as the pair get down on recording and mixing duties. There’s an air of Motorhead’s laryngitis howl, a thatch of Sabbath via Satori riffs and a cloud of smoke so thick that the band can cut their dry ice budget in half. Couldn’t be happier to see all these solo runs adding up to a year of heavy gems.




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Ty Segall

Just like last year started with a blast from Ty, so starts 2017 with a new album from the hardest working man in garage-psych. For his second eponymous venture, he’s departed from The Muggers, shaken the deliciously diseased vibes that flooded Emotional Mugger and returned to finding peace somewhere between the Bolan bound twinges of psych-folk come down with a beautiful case of the shakes and proto-metal’s thick, earthen hammer of fuzz. Segall’s made no over arching claims on this one, just that its the best batch of songs he’s had in him and that’s what he’s putting forward. No small proposal in a catalog that stretches longer than most artists could ever hope to muster, but the man makes good on his promises to lay down some true new gems, glittering among a career full of amp-toasted earworm nuggets.

He’s both at his heaviest, besting even the electrified armor heft of Slaughterhouse, and his most pastoral, taking Sleeper‘s mellow mind to task. The heavy standout here is the 10+ minute opus, “Warm Hands (Freedom Returned)” which goes ques up the guitar god clip for our judges in the audience. If you came for the heavy psych vibes and wallpaper peel, please proceed directly to track three and let your brain melt like butter in the sun. For me though, as much as I appreciate a good, hard mind flay, its the softer side that finds me coming back again and again. Pristine plums like “Take Care (To Comb Your Hair),” “Talkin'” and “Orange Color Queen” beg for quietude, calm air and an appreciation of the artist’s presumably ample collection of ’70s country, folk and psych slabs for their inspiration.

The album employs a new (and yet not so new – welcome back Emmet Kelly, Mikal Cronin and Charles Moothart) backing band that calls up old friends, cuts the crew down to a core that can’t miss and records one of the first true big studio albums in the artist’s career. Cut with minimal overdubs, just a band in a room working as a unit to bring an album beating to life, its an record that won’t let itself slip from view in a year that threatens to be choked with big banner releases. I think, for me at least, that’s why I’ll always be waiting to hear what Segall does next. Every new album will make good on promises to, if not outdo the last one, always be an essential and vital voice kicking holes in rock’s altar.



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Ty Segall – New Album / Single

I’d be remiss not to mention that the ever prolific Segall is embarking on yet another album, this one slated for early 2017. The album brings along many, though not all of the players who acted as The Muggers. Sadly missed are King Tuff and Cory Hanson, but he keeps the core of Emmett Kelley, Mikal Cronin and Charles Moothart in tact. There’s mention of some riffs that rival Slaughterhouse, but none are on display in the album’s first taste, “Orange Color Queen.” The track pulls its inspiration from a more languid side of pop folk that swims in plenty of sunset hues, driving to a stately close that’s pushing the sound much closer to Manipulator’s composed and collected odes than Emotional Mugger’s jittery fray. I’d expect any year to have no less than three albums related to Segall, John Dwyer and King Gizzard. Already got two of those boxes ticked and counting so 2017 is off running right (at least musically).


Elsewhere, Segall also slipped out a sly split single with Loch Lomond on the Dutch label Wet Bridge. The two artists each tackle a Harry Nilsson cover and Segall adds some itching weirdness to Nilsson’s “Gotta Get Up.” The man’s always had a knack for finding himself in covers and this is no different. Its a very fizzy take on the classic Schmilsson opener and works nicely as a pairing with the new track. The split single was available as a tour item but there’s still some left for lucky discoger’s out there.


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GØGGS

In hindsight there’s no shortage of “supergroups” that Ty Segall’s been involved in. The current version of the Muggers is stacked so high with garage talent that its a wonder there’s any brevity to Emotional Mugger. At the time of it’s release, a collaborative record with Tim Presley from White Fence wasn’t marked by the same stigma it would be now, given both artists’ elevated status, and same could be said for his freakout fuzz platter with Mikal Cronin. Suffice it to say that most of the people that the man gathers around himself could be considered for supergroup status and Fuzz is pretty much in the same category now anyhow. However, GØGGS is the first to really get the flag hoisted high over its head and one that lives up to the expectations that sticker supports. Its the hardest sound yet from a Segall orbiting body and that’s largely because while Ty is in the ring, its Ex-Cult’s Chris Shaw who provides the driving force and evil-eyed core of the band’s sound.

Fans of Ex-Cult have plenty to chew on here but for my money GØGGS is the pure distillation of where Shaw was headed with that band. Thicker, grimier and flecked with freaked out forms that may have spilled over from Moothart and Segall’s work together earlier this year; GØGGS is a testament to shaking up your lineup from time to time and finding the friends who know how to kick out the shaggiest shit from your dirtbag soul. There’s no fear in GØGGS, its a howler monkey pinned to corner and eager to bring the fight. In a year that’s been packed with garage greats, this one’s the biggest trash can fire of the bunch; raging out of control, jagged and dangerous. Its peak Ty, peak Shaw and peak Mootheart. If Emotional Mugger is the punch to the throat of 2016, then this is the finishing kick.



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