Posts Tagged ‘Centripetal Force’

Tambourinen – “Wooden Flower”

More good news out of the Centripetal Force and Cardinal Fuzz camps today. The labels are teaming up to issue Tambourinen’s Wooden Flower cassette from earlier in the year on LP. The band work of Grant Beyschau from Myrrors and its as heady as anything he’s put out with his mainstays. The title track is a monster of riff and groove, powering through a half ton fuzztone blast and settling into a swirl of German Progressive head throb. Guitars slice from speaker to speaker and a bubble of flute courses up from behind the fray. As the song winds down Beyschau transitions to a more sparkling vision of Kosmiche but the damage of “Wooden Flower” isn’t quite washed away by the glittering release of the final moments. The tape was gone in a flash, so this is a great second life for the release and a deserving shift to 12” with some space to spread out. The new edition is out November 13th.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Elkhorn

The second installment of Elkhorn’s snowed-in sessions from last year strips away the electricity and effects, but with the cords cut the session only delves further into their dark night of the soul. Acoustic Sessions conjures up a relaxed vision of something previously posed in the electric setting, but here its no retread, but a tap into their similar apocalyptic folk vision, kicking at the dust bowl barrens just after the amps have gone dry. Working repetition and stark minimalism into a psychedelic experience that puts the echoplex away and turns up the inner turmoil, the Acoustic Storm Sessions create something of a haunted introspection that cycles ‘round and around in the brain with the three players pushing their stringwork through meditative moments that tapped isolation before it was cool.

Passages feel like they come from several planes of sound at once, pulling gently for attention before another player’s fingers rack the focus back. The set is split into two side-long improvisations, with the first more biting than the second. They stir up the ash and bone with side-A, letting the wounds heal a bit with the healing of Side-B. That second side wafts into a tender territory — resolute, exhausted, mindful of the flow of the aural conversation the guitars share. The strings find tension and twist on the record, but just as often they find a sort of solace solace over the winding trip laid bare here. This is one of those releases that’s stunning for the fact that it wasn’t even the focus of the sessions. This is the second wave, but its no less accomplished than the first — a bonus session that’s hardly cutting room worthy.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Dire Wolves

Last year’s Grow Towards The Light was an absolute highlight of the year, pushing the boundaries of Dire Wolves’ sound to further heights of lysergic ecstasy. The band made a bit of a companion piece last year, but it wound up as a merch table totem that was hard to get into the hands of the many, especially from a multi-coast band that didn’t have a sizeable tour. Unless you were at a handful of great shows last year, I Just Wasn’t Made For These Set Times remained out of reach. Enter Centripetal Force, though, who’ve not only revived it, but laid it down to vinyl as well. The record ably amplifies the vibes that were strewn throughout GTTL, expounding upon the grey-hued mists that spring forth from their sound – a mysterious mélange of vocal incantations that seem to meld with the wind, violins that saw at the air with desperate, wild panic, and guitars that singe with subtlety.

Over the four tracks here the band stretch their strengths, packing in as much propulsive chaos as quiet moments of haunted introspection. The latter is particularly apparent on the side two opener “Circle of Friths,” a funereal specter that’s laced with sorrow. While Georgia Carbone might not put forth her woes in discernible language, the pain permeates the soul just as hard through her vocal exhumations. What’s most impressive is that this wasn’t even designed as an album proper, but a bonus for those who were taken by the live experience. Thankfully, Centripetal saw the release for what it was, a vital chink in the bands chain of releases that elevates the ache they put forth last year.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Jeffrey Alexander on Keith Jarrett’s – Restoration Ruin

Among the artists that dominated RSTB last year, Jeffrey Alexander was one of the most prolific, showing up with Dire Wolves (in one of their best yet), on a solo jaunt for Feeding Tube, and playing the RSTB anniversary show with a new group dubbed The Heavy Lidders. The latter featured members of Elkhorn and Bardo Pond laying waste to the blues in fine fashion. In anticipatetion for Dire Wolves’ latest album, on the way next month from Centripetal Force, Jeffrey’s contributed a pick to the Hidden Gems series. Picking out an oddity in the typically jazz-centric catalog of Keith Jarrett, he sheds some new light on an often maligned piece of the artist’s repertoire. Check out how this record came into Alexander’s life and what makes it such a treasure.

Continue Reading
0 Comments