Posts Tagged ‘Centripetal Force Records’

Nashville Ambient Ensemble – “Conversion”

A wash of relief floods the field with the first cut from the debut of the Nashville Ambient Ensemble. The record was brought together by composer Michael Hix, roping in some of the city’s best to add textures to his embryonic dose of cosmic country. The assembled players include Cynthia Cárdenas, Timon Kaple, Deli Paloma-Sisk, Kim Rueger, Jack Silverman and RSTB fave Luke Schneider on pedal steel. “Conversion” wafts in on a wave of euphoric steam, fogging the foreground with shifting synth and aqueous guitars that seep through the senses, radiating golden hues across the synapses with each progressive moment. The textured vocals dart through the mists unseen, feeling everywhere and nowhere until the song simply retreats back into the air. Hix’s ensemble pull an unseen weight from the mind and body, loosening the nerves with each second on their upcoming LP for Centripetal Force. The LP, Cerulean arrives on March 19th, and I’d recommend letting it find a way onto your speakers.

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Tambourinen

Earlier in the year The Myrrors Grant Beyschau issued a tape on Avant-Unity Music and it finds its way back into the world via a vinyl issue through Cardinal Fuzz and Feeding Tube this month. While the set shares a sense of exploration and cosmic consciousness with The Myrrors, the Tambourinen nods into a much more German Progressive zone than the ragged folk harmonics of his mainstay. The title track pushes the release into the heavy waters that are tread throughout, letting a nodding rhythm take control and with fuzz leads peeling the paint from the walls while a dousing of flutes cool the temperature somewhat. By the time the track lands in the clearing its left the turbulent sway for a life in the ethers, kicking cosmic dust back and forth between the speakers. The feeling stays on for the following track, “Wollensak,” an iced sluice through the quasars for that cleans up the rhythmic fray nicely.

Beyschau isn’t done with the tumult, though, the album’s other extended cut “Power To” returns right back to the fuzz-ravaged dirge of “Wooden Flower” and carves out a bit more space to let the album burrow into hypnotic headspace. The flutes are supplanted with sax hers and their burn permeates the consciousness deeper into a copper stained vision of drop-out meditation. The album caps off on a folk note that’s slightly incongruous with the deep-core jams that precede it but its a nice, slight nod back to The Myrrors and their frayed ends. This was a nice pickup by the labels and deserving of a vinyl press — a tape seems a bit under serving of the scope of flay that Beyschau can lay down.




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Elkhorn – “Acoustic Storm Sessions (exerpt)”

Earlier in the year Elkhorn released an album of pent-up psychedelic darkness and desperation that was forged in an unintentional lock-in during a snowstorm that caused them to miss a pivotal Brooklyn gig last year. The album, made with friend and collaborator Turner Williams, showed the band at their improvisational peak, exploring their psych-folk prowess by turning an environment of disappointment into something extraordinary. Seems that the album, which found them in a configuration with Jesse on acoustic, Drew on Electric, and Turner shifting between electric bouzouki on one side, shahi baaja on the next, spawned a sister album that’s just now seeing the light of day.

This time Elkhorn eschew the plugs to release their first completely acoustic album, letting three guitars entwine in the ice-ensconced studio to create something that’s both meditative and mercurial. Not quite born of the Basho/Fahey axis, not quite beholden to the kind of ambient plains dusters that spawned Barn Owl, this is is a more tempered vision of Elkhorn’s apocalyptic folk. On the sample below, you can feel just a small fraction of the scope of these acoustic sessions, stripped bare of the ozone-crackle of their psychedelic fry, but no less devastating in their barren burn. If anything, the austerity only enhances the permafrost isolation of the band’s stranded situation during the recording. The LP is out October 2nd on Centripetal Force and Cardinal Fuzz.




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White Manna – “Mythic Salon”

Long running California psych band White Manna returns with a split release for Centripetal Force and Cardinal Fuzz August 28th. While the blast-force riffs still abound on the album, on “Mythic Salon” there’s a drive towards rhythmic oblivion. Hewing closer to the German Progressive blueprint rather than the amplifier exhaust that they were known for early on, the track wraps elusive vocals around a percolating beat that’s haunted by horns over the distant hills. The song slots in nicely on ARC, as the LP shifts endlessly between growl and grind and the further reaches of space, noise, kosmiche, and Krautrock. It solidifies what the band were beginning to mold on Ape On Sunday, tightening their hold on cosmic psych and letting the spaces between the storm speak.





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Dire Wolves – “Myriads”

Another superb, smokey cut from Dire Wolves’ upcoming Centripetal Force LP, I Just Wasn’t Made For These Set Times, surfaces today. “Myriads” creeps out of the cobwebs with a séance slink. Anchored by the beguiling vocals of Georgia Carbone, the song hovers in air, hanging like a fog over the listener until the cold compress of its spell is broken. Arjun and Geoffrey spar on violin and guitar respectively, adding to the dizziness of the track that’s highlighted here in the Sheila Bosco-directed clip. As with many of the Wolves’ best cuts, this one is built to grow – a longform lurker that blossoms from quiet menace into a force of ecstatic expression. The band’s latest lands February 9th.

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Dire Wolves – “(Brother Lee) Womblife Blues”

Exciting news today as Dire Wolves announce another crusher for 2019. The band’s Grow Towards The Light is already a staple of the turntable around here, but they’re never ones to shy away from prolific output. Centripetal Force is putting the band’s I Just Wasn’t Made For These Set Times tape on LP. Not familiar? I don’t blame you. The release was previously only available as part of a 50-cassette run at the merch table on their last European tour, released by French label Ruralfaune. The release comes from the same fertile sessions that birthed Grow and Paradisiacal Mind and it’s rooted in much of the same meditative/explosive sensibilities that anchor their recent work.

On “(Brother Lee) Womblife Blues,” Georgia Carbone’s vocals transport the listener away from the physical world, leaving language bound to the Earth in favor of something more ephemeral. Like many of the Wolves’ compositions, Arjun Mendiratta’s violin elevates the track, sawing at the mind in sinewy swaths, while the battle between guitars and drums reaches a fevered pitch. There’s never a good reason to pass up on Dire Wolves vinyl, and this one’s probably not sticking to the shelves too long. The label’s putting out a run of 300, with 100 on sky blue. The pressing lands February 2020.


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My Body ‘Tis of Thee Comp – Centripetal Force Records

Nashville psych outpost Centripetal Force has a new benefit compilation out this month, with funds going to support NARAL Pro-Choice America in the wake of abortion legislation in Alabama, Ohio, and Missouri. Aside from the good cause, it’s got a pretty killer lineup of psych warriors in tow. The compilation features tracks from RSTB faves Vive La Void, Dire Wolves, Big Blood, Marisa Anderson, and Village of Spaces alongside several other greats. The comp is available digitally and on cassette. Check out the hypnotic “Desert Sky” from Sanae Yamada’s Vive La Void and a killer live cut, “Lion’s Mouth” from Dire Wolves below.



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