Posts Tagged ‘Canadian Psych’

Population II – “Ce n’est rêve”

The recently released LP from French-Canadian psych unit Population II balances creeping tension with explosive guitar and the band packs ever bit of the beauty of their CastleFace debut into “Ce n’est rêve” and the accompanying video. The song creeps into view with dry ice ambiance before bass and organ begin to gnaw at the edges. As the song reaches its culmination, the speakers are on fire with fuzz and rhythm and the band pairs it well with a ’60s light show inspired video that’s every bit as haunting as the song in its simplicity. The new LP is out now and highly recommended.



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Population II – “Introspection”

Castleface’s international contingent has a strong showing, though mostly from Australia with entires from Total Control, King Gizz, and ORB, but they’ve picked up some swingers from Quebec who are pushing a French-tipped, prog-rifled model that’s as heavy and heady as any in their stable. The band lets some air into the chamber as the album progresses, but opener “Introspection” barrels into the record with a noxious guitar growl, psych-blooze stomp, and some sax scorch just for good measure. The song’s very core is built on the need to let the kernel of rock blossom in the brains of those infected with its ferocity. The band sums it perhaps better, noting that “Introspection is an immersion in the mind of one who feels the energy of raw Rock n ‘Roll running through its veins for the first time. Instantly, comes the need to transmit and amplify it.” The song’s built on the the molten core of ’70 experimentation, melting Amon Düül II and Embryo into a furious export from another time. À La Ô Terre is out October 30th from the West Coast psych stable.




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R. McClure & Tall Shadows – “What Have I Done / Me and My Hangover”

More goodness from our neighbors to the North today, with a single from R. McClure & Tall Shadows. McClure wades into the cosmic end of the country spectrum, layering his twang with a gauzy glare that settles onto the speakers in folds of pink fog. The A-side is subdued and nestled into a hammock of harmonies that rock in the breeze. Like his fellow Canadian crooner James Matthew VII he’s plucking some fruit from the trees of Beachwood Sparks, finding that bliss between the bars and its always good to see folks picking at that lineage. The b-side kicks up the tempo and backs off the fog machines just a touch, but there’s still a pillowed glow around the track. The flip might actually be the winner here, as it balances the soft-touch with a heavier dose of slide guitar glee, still scraping the cosmos, but with a bit of dirt caught in its boots. From the sounds of this and a few other scattered tracks from an upcoming LP on Factotum, McClure marks himself as one to watch.




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The Cosmic Range

Its such a packed year, that as we enter the mid-point its time to go back and sweep out some of the great releases that got lost in the cavalcade. That includes the sorely under-appreciated sophomore LP from Canada’s Cosmic Range. The band, much like their close contemporaries in Badge Epoque Ensemble, is comprised largely of players who found themselves in and around the backing band from last year’s U.S. Girls release. Featuring the likes of Matthew ‘Doc” Dunn and Maximillian (Slim Twig) Turnbull, the record scratches a familiar itch that claws at the crux of jazz, psych, and funk. The band is dipped and doused in the hash den Ashram of ‘70s Miles Davis on his run between the Brew and the Corner. They’re beset with the same shakes that lit up the nerves on Nation Time and they’re weeding out the same calm collective gardens that Alice Coltrane tended.

There’s more than a little hazed quasar space rock floating in the froth as well and the band pulls the throttle way back for the disquieting loneliness of “Eyes for Rivers” before they spark back up for the double barrel burn of “The Observer.” Rhythm is a constant throughout the album, whether tapping out a tender cosmic sendoff or bringing the punishing pound of a polyrhythmic puzzle. The band’s clearly comprised of seasoned vets bouncing their highest beta wave wobble among the collective consciousness. The record is a heady hit, blown through with psychedelic sax n’ wah fried guitar grooves that’ll sate the most ardent heads out there. If you’ve heard the tangential works that the players have cropped up on, then it should come as little surprise that the alchemy is strong among this bunch. Highly recommended that you lock in and let this one wash over you.




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