Posts Tagged ‘Big Blood’

Big Blood

The collaborations between Cardinal Fuzz and Feeding Tube continue and this time they bring out another incarnation from the always entrancing Big Blood. This one’s an older bit of the Big Blood story, but its finally making its way to vinyl thanks to both labels. The family that harnesses the vibrations of the infinite together stays together, or so they say and while the pair includes daughter Quinnasa, this might mark her first appearance via the charming closer. Caleb and Colleen cut their teeth in Cerberus Shoal and Fire on Fire, but its always been Big Blood that’s truly felt like their own skin to inhabit and augment. This is one of the records in their stable that feels like they truly came into their own under the name. Dark Country Magic pretty much sums up the feeling here perfectly — the peace and love of their newer albums is traded in favor of a more dire psych-folk framework.

The moods are largely poisoned, shrouded, alone in the forest in harmony with silt and soil by day and offering blood to the moon by night. Big Blood’s emphasis on the ragged chorus of vocals remains one to their most effective tools and they can turn it from jubilant to harrowing within the space of minutes. They do let the veil slip mid record to dance in a full sun ceremony, but within the context of the rest of the record, the atypical moment in the sun feels more like a facade to put the listener at ease before the coven turns on them once the sun escapes the sky. Clatters of percussion, dusty guitars, and Kinsella’s vocals that leave an imprint on your soul — the record has everything a Big Blood fan could ask for.




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Big Blood

Another one from the ranks of Raven’s past, Big Blood has been a bit of a fixture here (and on the old Blogspot) since back in ’08 when The Grove grace my ears. The band’s continued with a rather enviable output over the years. Following their work with Cerberus Shoal and the always underrated Fire On Fire, the couple has kept a stead stream of records and CD-rs coming out on their own Don’t Trust The Ruin, Time-Lag, Blackest Rainbow and Feeding Tube. The latter lands as the home to their latest, The Daughter’s Union. The album was actually recorded prior to their last Feeding Tube outing, Operate Spaceship Earth Properly, which came out last year, but with the band’s dense catalog it’s sometimes hard to keep track. The title likely alludes to the fact that this is the first album that fully features the couple’s daughter Quinnisa, and her contributions, as on its companion from last year, give the band a harder edge.

While the sound is a bit toughened at the edges, that doesn’t mean the band has lost their folk hearts. Transitioning from their early, wooded sound into more Fairport/Josephine Foster territory that gives rock a place at the folk table, they let the new heaviness seem in organically. Colleen and Quinnasa meld their vocals into shaky, aching harmonies while underneath there’s a renewed sense of rhythm and riot. The band tackles some unlikely sources for covers (The Troggs, Silver Apples) and they fit the album together into a psych-soaked vision of ‘70s-indebted rock that’s floating somewhere between the Laurel Valley and the Eastern mountain ranges. The record is another solid endorsement of Big Blood’s prowess – a veteran band that only seems to steep their sound further in their influences, interpolating them and weaving folk and rock into an inviting wicker warmer. If you’re not already coveting each new Big Blood release, it might be time to start.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE (dig) or HERE (LP).

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Village of Spaces – “Pace and Gait”

A bucolic new video from Village of Spaces, the duo of Dan Beckman-Moon and his partner Amy Moon Offerman-Sims along with a constantly revolving chorus of players from Big Blood, Amps for Christ, Dire Wolves among others walking the cosmic trail. “Pace and Gait” is a buzzing, serene piece of psych-folk, though its more interested in soothing the soul than wobbling the listener off their axis. Beckman-Moon’s slightly nasal croon lulls the listener to a place of lamplight solitude and the flood of background voices makes the invitation seem pretty tempting. The video is awash in hazy seaside imagery that recalls the cooler end of the summer, with the band feeling like local residents of a summer town once the influx of weekend drop-ins has finally skidded to a close and the true calm of the place is restored once again. The band’s LP, Shaped by Place is out next week on Feeding Tube.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

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