Posts Tagged ‘Aussie Punk’

Manikins – From Broadway To Blazes

While Australia’s premiere punk darlings The Scientists have enjoyed some much deserved reissue treatment from Numero in the last couple of years, another of the country’s punk forefathers has remained criminally undersung. Manufactured Recordings attempts to right this with an anthology of all known tracks from Manikins. The band, like The Scientists, was built from a former member of Aussie punk germinators The Cheap Nasties. Neil Fernandes built up his own orbit of tough-edged power pop, though the band would spawn considerably less material than their more well-known compatriots.

The anthology includes their first three 7″s, which have become power pop collector’s items in their own right, stretching into high dollar brackets on the secondary market. For those with shallower pockets, it’s nice to have these tracks included here and all dusted off for digital. Fernandes’ songs hit just right in the crux of punk and garage, though they certainly get a bit more polished on later cuts. He’s ably found a foil in vocalist Robert Porritt, who gives Manikins a boyish sneer that’s prerequisite for the best power pop. All in all, this is for the diggers, the nerd set. It’s the kind of deep cut release that appeals to genre completists, but that’s not to say that the average ’70s mixtape couldn’t stand a bump from any of these gems. Any fan of Aussie punk history or power pop in general would do well to tuck into this one.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Cable Ties – “Difficult”

Still can’t get enough of Melbourne trio Cable Ties. Details on the upcoming album are sadly scant, but they keep dropping gems along the way, so the wait’s not so bad. Following on their debut single and a split with Wet Lips, they have a new track featured on LISTEN Records compilation Listen 2. The comp sends 50% of the benefits to WAR (Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance) and the label itself seeks to promote female and LGBTQ artists in Australia. Good will and great vibes aside on the project, the track is another killer from the Aussie band, still hitting the boiling point energy that seems to make the walls sweat and the room spin. While vocalist Jenny McKechnie, as usual, draws the lion’s share of attention on the track, the underlying instrumental is a gnashed ball of fury and noisy bounce that’s proof that as the band evolves, they’re simply proving that the early excitement wasn’t misplaced in the least.



Support the comp. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Le Villejuif Underground – “Villejuif Underground”

After one of my favorite LPs of the year, Nathan Roche and his mottly band are back with a new single for France’s Born Bad records and in true fashion they extend their self-homage even further by writing a theme song for themselves and their namesake neighborhood. Full of roustabouts at best, the band paints the Paris neighborhood as a welcoming embrace for artists like themselves. The song’s rambling, untethered style fits the video well, a barrage of images smudged with a scattershot regard for cohesion. The song accompanies three others on a new EP out for the label and continues the band’s and Roche’s own seemingly charmed and chaotic existence.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

RSTB Best Reissues of 2016

If you’re familiar with Raven Sings the Blues, then you know that reissues and digging through the past play an important role in coverage on the site. Aside from the stellar new releases out this year, several companies stepped up to deliver reissues of essential material that could very well have been lost to time. This is a weird time in the life of a reissue label, a time where major labels are cranking out as much vinyl fodder as possible, with less than a fraction of it being records that couldn’t just be picked up in a $5 bin in decent condition. These are some of the reissues that I thought were deserving of accolades this year.

Continue Reading
0 Comments

Terry

Bottom line is, coming out of Aussie pop’s jangled jungle, anything with Al Montfort attached is a solid bet and you know what, Terry doesn’t break that streak. Montfort’s been attached to Total Control, Dick Diver, Lower Plenty and Bitch Prefect – all of which have found their way into RSTB’s heart over the years. For Terry, Al hooks up with a few other luminaries of the Aussie underground, that scene being nothing less than incestuous and reveling in swapping members between bands at ease. The resulting record, after a few singles and whatnot, is loose and jangled, with toughskinned knees. Its roughed up and kicking in the dirt. There’s a driving sense, a pop itch that nags at your brain and finds the lobes nodding along uncontrollably. And yet they also cover their songs in a nice slash and soak of noise that keeps any jangle from getting remotely close to precious. The squelch knocks the post-punk playthings into the no-wave yard for a bit but never stays put. They sway to the jangle-pop muses but destroy what’s beautiful before you catch them playing too nicely.

For fans of any of Montfrot’s catalog, or even member Amy Hill’s tenure in Constant Mongrel there’s a lot to love here. Terry is splitting the difference between the angled scrapes of Total Control and the college-sweatered pop of Dick Diver. Terry HQ kicks hard to the shins and it doesn’t entirely play fair. Its the kind of record feels like its been sitting in a bin waiting to be discovered. It’s not of this time, but at the same time, when besides 2016 could this kind of blistered blast be so acclaimed? So for that, I’m grateful. Listen in to this tangled nest of a record and find a new weave each time. There’s a lot of ragged joy to absorb here.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments