Endless Boogie

Since the crack of the aughts, one of the most consistent sources of primal rock pummel has been between the runouts of an Endless Boogie LP. While all around them rose up the ghost of garage rock gone graceless, the Boogie felt the heat of the beast emanating from basements and cracked practice spaces they’d hollowed out into homes. There was never an element of style playing against substance, the Boogie is substance, pure and plain. They will any notion of style to life out of the sweat vapors and tube filament char left lingering in the caked atmosphere of the room they’re punishing at the moment. While the recordings post-Focus Level began to use the studio to their advantage, Volume 1 and Volume 2 were the raw reek of the concrete wall captured to tape. Thankfully, for any who missed out on crusted copies of their early days got a crack at these bound up by No Quarter in 2019.

Last year the label did one better and unsealed the long amassing vaults of practice space tapes, presenting them here as a 4LP set of sternum disrupting floor shakers that contained unheard and unreleased treasures. Though some may have slipped out on march table CD-rs, more often than not these recordings were privy only to the band as they shaved these basement rituals into fodder for studio thunder to come. As much as the band lives on the stage — a coordinated animal attack of ferocious Zone X boogie — their true habitat may well be the practice space. There, during 3 AM exhumations of demon sweat, the band brings forth the pure and unadulterated form of the Boogie. It’s a fair question to ask; “Do I need 4 LPs of Endless Boogie thunder?” You do, my fried, I assure you, you do more than you could ever know. The band will always continue to evolve into the next stage of rock’s soul — the elemental sound that we all need, presented in pure throb, the first time it slips from your speakers. Yet here, with two Sweeneys in tow and no expectations on them, no audience intended, the band is absolute heat and light. That’s a thing you need to experience in your own living room. There are still some of these boxes left at the label and I wouldn’t wait too long to scrape together the scratch for this one. Hell, don’t eat for a week, there’s no gnawing hunger that might be more mighty than the hunger for insistent churn between the grooves of these four platters.


Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Dom & The Wizards – “Outlaws & The Cops”

As the rusted bite of Wireheads receded in the distance a misshapen form grew out of the rubble and Dom & The Wizards took shape. Over releases scant in form and hard to pin down Dom Trimboli has amassed a new entourage of players that follow in the discordant pop stumble of his previous outfit, albeit with a bit less tin in their teeth and a bit more time for lounging by the rented pool to stare past the sun, sipping beers and pondering the squirm of life. The band has finally announced a debut LP, The Australian Cyclone Intensity Scale, landing at a familiar haunting hollow over at Tenth Court. “Outlaws and the Cops” lets the sunstroke pop sink in — strums askew and that familiar fiddle sawing at the rear lobes of the brain for good measure. The new LP lands April 2nd, with a stacked cast of Aussie outsiders making this one sweat — Vic Conrad and Col Gellard of the Garden Path, Jess Johns of Dead Roo, Tom Spall and Harry Freeman of the High Beamers and Liam Kenny of Wireheads. Keep an ear to what Dom’s doing in the South Hemi. That’s my advice.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Cool Sounds

While the band’s last album tried to fill the collective hole in their hearts from the loss of bandmate Zac Denton, on their latest, Cool Sounds seek a sound that trends towards a balance of bliss. They’ve always had a knack for concocting a sound that lays into a pocket of funk-striped indie pop, balancing comfort and cool, but here that dichotomy seems almost perfectly rendered. Underpinning the album is a crisp crackle of drums that snags the listener from afar. Its hard not to nod and let down the guards when Cool Sounds hits the speakers. The guitars and vocals fade in on hazed sunbeam — lounged, hip swung, carefree but not careless.

Perhaps that’s the best praise that can be laid on Bystander — when its playing everything seems a bit easer. In a year of clenched teeth and chaos that’s almost indispensable. The album isn’t a balm, that term has been broken and beaten, and anyway a balm seems something more inert than Cool Sounds could ever become. The album is a catalyst, helping to bring down the temperature in a room, to loosen the layers of life until they return to a state of balance once more. With an elastic snap, a slouched wink and a creep that treads like a slip-on but grips like a velvet vice, the songs on Bystander work their way at a molecular level to kick the serotonin up a notch. Sure, there are records that shake the foundations and force you to change with them, but right about now I’m all for a subtle boost of good graces flowing through my cells.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Sunburned Hand of the Man – “Black Lights”

It’s already been a hell of a day full of announcements and tracks, but this may as well serve as a timely reminder that Sunburned Hand of the Man have a new LP on the way, and it serves as a killer follow-up to their Intentions release from last year. The first couple of singles have focused on the more taught, rhythmic elements in the band and following in the mold of “Flex,” “Black Lights” is another twisted throb in the night — squirming rhythms shot through with creosote guitars and ecstatic moans. This one is the next entry into the 20th anniversary run over at Three Lobed and sounding like just the thing to celebrate the label’s longevity. The record lands on shelves March 12th. Mark the date.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Ryley Walker – “Rang Dizzy”

Right off the release of his live collaboration with Kikagaku Moyo, Ryley Walker announces a new solo LP and it’s preceded by the heavy-hearted sway of “Rang Dizzy.” The song is hung with a sense of world-weariness that soaks every line that Walker utters. The cut is burnt out on the bleary day to day — recalling the dizzying fall before Walker’s sobriety. The record moves from the post-rock punch of Deafman’s Glance to an elegiac, prog-dipped folk that touches through Buckley and Harper territory, produced by Tortoise’s John McEntire and featuring a cast of excellent collaborators. This may be a solo LP, but its not solitary — Bill MacKay, Ryan Jewell, McEntire, Andrew Scott Young and others form the backbone of the record, pushing this towards Ryley’s best yet. The new LP lands on his own Husky Pants label, marking the first solo record he’s put out on the imprint. Course In Fable arrives April 2nd.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Rose City Band – “Lonely Spaces”

The musical landscape of 2021 just keeps getting better. Having already soundtracked 2020 with the excellent Summerlong from Rose City Band, Ripley Johnson gives us all a new companion to our solitude. The last album was marked by its breezy communal feel — a celebration of the road that got under the skin to spread the warmth of eternal summer. Earth Trip is by turns a much more solitary record, as might be expected of something recorded over the past year. The first song slows his Summerlong pace and simmers in the feeling of space and the ache of loneliness. Though it finds a silver lining in the joys of being alone in nature that might otherwise be spoiled by a crowd.

Still marked by Ripley’s sun-washed cosmic country that merges West Coast psych with private press ‘70s country, but this time the pace is slowed and that sense of ease that was ever-present in the past is tinged with a bittersweet ache. While the record was recorded mostly at home in Johnson’s studio, Rip’s glycerine guitar passages are offset by some excellent pedal steel work by one of 2020’s consistent stunners — Barry Walker Jr. “Lonely Places” practically sighs with Walker’s contributions, helping the listener get lost in the verdant respite of Johnson’s song. The new LP is out May 21st from Thrill Jockey.


Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Rat Columns

One of the joys of following David West’s evolution as Rat Columns has been his incredible ability to absorb styles and genres and constantly shift the idea of what defines the band’s sound. The early records were dark and sheltered, a far cry from 2017’s excellent, and hard to pin down Candle Power. With just a quick EP in between, the new record shifts once again, jettisoning the focus on jangle-pop and synth-pop poles in favor of a larger power pop sound. If anything, though, Pacific Kiss is one of the most concise and consistent records West has ever done, outside of his solo LP from a few years back.

The guitars are brought out into the sunshine to glow and purr under the dawn. There’s a rather fun immediacy to the new record that comes through in the keys supplied by Joey Fishman. HIs touches give the LP a resplendent pop shimmer, aided and abetted by the background vocals of Amber Gempton and Raven Mahon (The Green Child). That’s not to say that the moodiness of West’s past has gone completely by the wayside. When he skews melancholy there’s still the draped emotionality that has long marked his songwriting, just dressed up a bit in production and punch. This is West at his best, picking out the gilded pieces of his past few records and melting them down into the polished pop geodes that populate the new record.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Emily Rodgers – “I Will Be Gone”

There’s palpable sadness at the heart of Emily Rodgers’ new song “I Will Be Gone.” The track ruminates on the loss of Emily’s brother who died fifteen years previous as a casualty of schizophrenia-related suicide. The song vibrates inside a cocoon of grief — feelings of machinations out of one’s control, a lump in the throat that never quite leaves, even though the loved one has left a permanent shadow on life. She ruminates on the phrase “I knew him when he was well,” rolling the memory of the man she knew through the obfuscating mists of memory’s hold. Imprints of sweetness attempting to keep hold over the final scars. The record was produced by Kramer (Galaxie 500, Low) and finds itself landing on the roster of a newly reinvigorated Shimmy-Disc. The album, which shares its title with the track, will be out April 16th.


Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Cool Ghouls – “The Way I Made You Cry”

A second peek into the new Cool Ghouls slides this way today, smother than the last. While the band has embraced plenty of ‘60s psych-pop influences and jangled angles in the past, this time they’re finding the buttery pop center of the past and whipping up a record packed with lovely turns. With a Chicago-sized horn section swooning in the background, the band goes full early Rundgren, tugging at the heartstrings and laying out a melancholy plea for forgiveness. The new LP certainly lets the band wade around new corners of their influence and this cut proves just how far they’re willing to reach. The new record, At George’s Zoo is out March 12th from Empty Cellar.




Support the artist. Buy the album HERE.

0 Comments

RSTB Radio Show: February

I’m sure I say this every month, but this month’s episode of Crawl Out From the Fallout is particularly good. The year’s already starting off strong with some excellent new music from John Dwyer, Sunburned Hand of the Man, Mythic Sunship, Rat Columns, Cory Hanson, The Reds, Pinks and Purples, and Yasmin Williams and tons more. The show is packed, starting off with a psych-jazz seep before swapping for pop and a lush folk fold-out. The full tacklist is below and you can stream the show over at WGXC if you missed the broadcast last night.

::Tracklist::

Don Cherry – Brown Rice /// Djinn – Love Divine /// John Dwyer – City Maggot /// Sunburned Hand of the Man – Flex /// Mythic Sunship – Maelstrom /// Cory Hanson – Angeles /// American Culture – Silence /// Cool Sounds – Crimson Mask /// Buffet Lunch – Red Apple Happiness /// Oh-OK – Brother /// Rat Columns – I Can’t Live On Love /// The Reds, Pinks and Purples – Don’t Ever Pray In The Church On My Street /// The Rain Parade – Broken Horse /// Hotels on Mars – Worst Year on Record /// New Bums – Tuned To Graffiti /// The Peacers – Irish Suit /// Yasmin Williams – Sunshowers /// Bill MacKay & Nathan Bowles – Joy Ride /// Russell Hoke – Jesus Understands /// Rob Noyes – Dwelling /// Sachiko Kanenobu – Toki Ni Makasete /// Quilt – Children of Light /// Sunforest – Magician In The Mountain /// Jantar – Bergen op Zoom /// Painted Shrines – Heaven and Holy /// Cool Ghouls – Helpless Circumstance /// The Pink Stones – Blueberry Dream /// Pearl Charles – Magic Mirror /// Sam Burton – Nothing Touches Me /// Michael Hurley – No Home

0 Comments

Sign up for the RSTB digest and receive a compact version of the best of Raven every two weeks.