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Terry – “Spud”

Ah bless ‘em there’s a new Terry tune about this morning. The band, fresh off the fallout from their third stunner I’m Terry, has a new 7,” Who’s Terry? and it bangs right in with their jangle-jerked political pop on first cut “Spud.” The band take their sights, suit up and get a ridicule riot in motion for the video, but underneath the Strangelove-ian clip, the band does what they do best – fizz n’ strum with a wink and a nudge and no small amount of catchy quirk. Damn fine janglin’ if you ask me. The single pops ‘round the turntable on July 19th.

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Kandodo – “King Vulture”

Bristol trio Kandodo, which features Simon Price (The Heads) and John McBain (Monster Magnet, Desert Sessions), return to the fold this week with the announcement of their latest album, K3. The first cut is a floating bit of drone shimmer that’s buoyed by a serene video by Sanae Yamada (Moon Duo, Viva La Void). “King Vulture” builds on a slow creep of quasar-crusted euphoria that crushes itself slowly over the course of six and a half minutes of bliss. Check the video above and keep an eye out for the band’s latest on Rooster Rock June 21st.

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Modern Nature – “Peradam”

Jack Cooper’s (Ultimate Painting, Mazes) new haunt Modern Nature announces an album to follow up their stellar 12” from earlier this year. First offering “Peradam” isn’t quite as rooted in the motorik mindset that held sway on “Nature,” but its still got rhythm on its mind and a sweeping sense of motion beneath the autumnal croon of Cooper and the soft scuttle of sax. How To Live is being billed as a halfway hideaway between Neu and Can’s German Progressive patter and the more lilting folk of Caravan. Honestly, I’m all in on the prog-folk permutations that Cooper’s tumbling through, and while this track has some fine charms, I have a feeling the key’s going to be locking the whole album together into a tapestry of propulsion and strum. The record employs some fine extended bench, with Cooper collaborating mainly with Will Young of BEAK> with contributions from Aaron Nevue (Woods) and Jeff obias (Sunwatchers). Check out the first video above and look out for the new LP August 23rd on Bella Union.



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Craig Leon – “The Gates Made Plain”

Craig Leon continues his exploration of imagined extraterrestrial information left behind in early African civilizations and spread across the globe. Volume 2 of “The Canon” expands on his 2014 collection of interplanetary folk tales that coupled his groundbreaking work Nommos with its follow-up Visiting. The new collection is vibrating on the same brainwaves of resplendent bliss and shimmering meditative psych and new cut “The Gates Made Plain” captures the essence of what Leon’s been building over the years. The track is draped in drones, pulsating with a ripple of percussion, and hung high with a sense of inching anticipation. The new volume is out May 24th from RVNG, Intl. Check out the video for the track below, which features visuals from Leon’s touring show directd by Milton Melvin Croissant III.



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Daughter of Swords – “Dawnbreaker”

Vermont trio Mountain Man have always had an out-of-time feeling to their songs, conjuring up visions of Appalachian folk that, while sparse, hang on the air with a permanence that upsets their fragility. On her solo debut at Daughter of Swords, the band’s Alexandra Sauser-Monnig captures many of the same feelings, just without the three-part harmonies that have always pulled in an “Oh, Brother Where Art Thou” feeling. The ode to breaking dawn is a simple, rambling folk song, but Sauser-Monnig’s voice hangs on the air sweet as dew, yearning for summer mornings when the air is warm as an embrace, autumn mornings when the stillness of solitude is practically spiritual, and spring mornings when the sun chases away the last night’s downpour. Her debut is out June 28th on Nonesuch.

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Blue Jeans – “Friends & Lovers”

Got a brand-new track from Michigan jangle-pop trio Blue Jeans and its swimming in allusions to the golden years of the twee end of the spectrum. Shades of classic Slumberland, Cloudberry, Flying Nun, and Subway abound, and with good reason. The band boasts a trio of music writers, alongside Saturday Looks Good To Me’s Fred Thomas, at their core. The band leaves influences draped all over their sleeves and the joy they get from dipping into the fray is palpable. The song itself celebrates making records, listening to records, and loving records with the kind of anguish that makes one stay awake late at night playing a song over and over into the headphones until the dark finally wins the fight. They’ve captured the long sigh of indie-pop with the attention to detail of listeners who’ve made it their duty to absorb every last lingering lilt. Check out the zine-worthy video above and be sure to keep an eye out for their debut LP May 17th.



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Village of Spaces – “Pace and Gait”

A bucolic new video from Village of Spaces, the duo of Dan Beckman-Moon and his partner Amy Moon Offerman-Sims along with a constantly revolving chorus of players from Big Blood, Amps for Christ, Dire Wolves among others walking the cosmic trail. “Pace and Gait” is a buzzing, serene piece of psych-folk, though its more interested in soothing the soul than wobbling the listener off their axis. Beckman-Moon’s slightly nasal croon lulls the listener to a place of lamplight solitude and the flood of background voices makes the invitation seem pretty tempting. The video is awash in hazy seaside imagery that recalls the cooler end of the summer, with the band feeling like local residents of a summer town once the influx of weekend drop-ins has finally skidded to a close and the true calm of the place is restored once again. The band’s LP, Shaped by Place is out next week on Feeding Tube.



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Bleached – “Shitty Ballet”

Bleached have been on a constant tumble away from garage their whole career and with “Shitty Ballet,” they’ve rolled clean out. The track is patient and coiled, starting with the spare, yet driven guitar of Jessica Clavin and followed soon by the perfectly exasperated vocals of her sister Jennifer. The track’s a build to an inevitable breaking point. You can feel it coming on from the moment the first strum hits, but its no less satisfying when the band finally breaks down the levee and lets loose with a torrent of fuzz, crashing through with a deluge of frustration that melts into catharsis. They red-line the song without a care for fidelity or formality and it’s the kind of scream along satisfaction that picks at the best scabs of ‘90s indie. Catch the video for the new song above.

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Business of Dreams – “Ripe For Anarchy”

Still one of the most criminally overlooked releases of the year, Corey Cunningham’s (Terry Malst, Smokescreens) Business of Dreams showed no signs of a sophomore slump on his latest LP for Slumberland. The record perfectly encapsulates the melancholy, wistfulness, and tenderness of the best jangle-pop and synth-pop, slotting him in easily among bands on the Creation and Sarah Records rosters in any mix. He’s heading out on tour with Jessica Pratt and released a new video for the album’s title track “Ripe For Anarchy.” The spare treatment of the video sums up the album’s vibes with its overcast hues and sighed atmospheres. Check out the clip above, and if you haven’t snagged a copy yet, its probably about time.



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Elkhorn – “Song of the Son”

I’ve already shared a look into Elkhorn’s gorgeous, Sun Cycle, but one more couldn’t hurt, right? The duo has another simple, yet perfectly spare video of them live in the room, this time playing “Song of the Son,” with Eric Silver and Josh Johnson capturing the performance. This time there’s less of the cinder and smoke than pervades “To See Darkness,” revealing the pair’s ability to bottle joy into nearly nine minutes of pastoral perfection. The lighter mood by no means lessens the intricate complexity of the pair’s playing – a threaded web of strings that comes off effortless but is as dense and delicate as any natural wonder. The track come from their soon to be released double set – Sun Cycle, which sees them playing as a duo, and Elk Jam, which works as a quartet with Ryan Jewell and Willie Lane. Both are out on Feeding Tube next week.



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