Browsing Category Videos

Hockey Dad – “Can’t Have Them”

Hands down one of the most fun bands I saw at CMJ last year was Aussie duo Hockey Dad. The band have been clangin’ around their own Aussie scene, but with a album poised on Kanine shortly, they’re likely to make much more of a dent on US listeners in the months to come. Prior to the album, the single “Cant’ Have Them” seems to sum up their chilled brand janglin punk and the super saturated video to match is vibing pretty hard here. Honestly this is an album that I have high hopes on for the year and I’d say to keep all ears pointed at the Wollongong duo for some earworms that’ll nag you for the next six months.

0 Comments

Timmy’s Organism – “Heartless Heathen”

If you haven’t had the pleasure, there really is nothing better than Timmy Vulgar on stage in his crazed hobo, psychedelic warlord element. This video might be the best approximation of the experience I’ve seen next to feeling the paint thinner vibes head on from the stage. Gotta love that Jack White’s honoring a hometown hero with the release of this record on Third Man’s new imprint. The people need more crazy in their life and, hell, Timmy can shred with the best of them so more power to the folks that find their way down the rabbit hole this way. If you haven’t picked up a copy of the long player yet, then now’s the time.

Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Kevin Morby – “I Have Been To The Mountain”

Kevin Morby’s rise has been well deserved. Coming out of The Babies into a weightier singer-songwriter territory that coalesced on Still Life, the singer’s jumping to Dead Oceans for his latest and the first sounds are just as engrossing as that LP. The video for “I Have Been To The Mountain” is equally striped with death and comedy, a mix of light and dark that seems pretty spot on for a Morby track. The LP arrives in April and hopes are high that the full release lives up to the expectations set by Still Life


Support the Artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Night Beats

Night Beats are back, steadily threading the needle of psych and garage with a strand of soul that’s just fine enough to get lost in the clamor while still tying things up nicely. The band’s climbed up to a larger label and a bigger sound, though still genuinely on the same general path they’ve been weaving along all these many years. The record opens on a cryptic note before exploding into the ravaged psych of “Power Child,” one of the standouts of the set. As is typical of Night Beats, while there’s a certain amount of sweat (see “No Cops”), there’s plenty more instances where the band lays back into groove, letting a dark, smokey veneer overlay the record like a pervading ethos. The band knows how to keep their garage dipped and dripped in the low hang of stage fog, swaddled in sunglasses and baking in leathers in the 90 degree heat without so much as a break in stride to acknowledge there might be any cause for discomfort. They’re longstanding dues payers to the cult of composed cool and for the most part they know how to wield that cool like a weapon throughout Who Sold My Generation. Most garage long players are best when taken to task on the hi-fi speakers but the grotto nuance here actually finds this album best set on headphones or confined to the car; its a loner’s record and it’s best to keep it contained. Let the outside world wonder what’s moving your head.

Listen:


Support the artist. Buy it: HERE.

0 Comments

Bleached – “Keep On Keepin’ On

I’ve always had a soft spot for Bleached. Their run of singles leading up to Ride Your Heart were doused in a 90’s charm that was hard to shake and the album came through only to strengthen the good will they’d built up. This new taste of upcoming album Welcome The Worms is definitely a darker turn. The sound is thicker, less surf and bounce and more driving rock. The lyrics seated in decisively sour, if not toxic relationship. The band accompanies the guitar crunch and lyrical lash with a video that’s anxious and permeated with a stalker’s eye. Its good to have the trio back and seemingly sounding bigger than they have before.


Support the band. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

The Silence – “Ancient Wind Pt. 3”

Masaki Batoh’s The Silence sneaks in another album before the end of the year and its a fuller and more raucous outing than their self-titled debut earlier in 2015. The album is anchored by the massive three part piece “Ancient Wind” and they’ve just shared a video for the song that pretty much paints the visual they were going for on the psych-folk cycle. Swirling kaleidoscopic visuals that flash in epileptic warning to the song’s frantic mix of percussive thump and flute solos that will probably give your dad full on Tull flashbacks. Its a pretty decent way to spend six minutes.



Support the artist. Buy it: HERE

0 Comments

Juventud Juché – “En Tu Casa”

Inspired by our discovery of some of Portugal’s great new punk bands, we’ve been digging in on their neighbors from Spain. This new video for Madrid’s Juventud Juché provides a glitchy, dark backdrop to the band’s bracing brand of post-punk. Gnarled and pulsing, the track is the b-side to a single the band put out earlier in the year for Spanish indie Sonido Muchacho and both are just one more reason to keep your eyes on the Spanish/Portugese underground.


Support the artist. Buy it: HERE

0 Comments

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard

King Gizz are keeping their two a year pace with a new full length to cap a pretty incredible year. Always ones to keep the audience wary and on their toes, they exit the jazz rock conceptual phase of Quarters and the dog-eared burnt psych of I’m In Your Mind Fuzz to take things down several notches… volume-wise, at least. The band self-imposed an “acoustic instruments only” policy on the record, roped together some sounds they’d previously never explored (clarinet, cello, double bass) and headed to a shipping container on Stu Mackenzie’s parents farm to record this sucker. The result is a pretty captivating and lilting collection of pop songs that embraces the pastoral background of its origins nicely. The darkness that’s billowed at the corners of their previous work is lifted somewhat and they get back to the weirdness and free spirit rambling of Oddments but still present some of their most easily accessible songs yet. The long winding jam is ever the band’s forte and while they may have turned the electricity off they haven’t exactly lost their ability to bend a song into a frantic bit of blues that explodes into 70’s tinged stadium-sized glory. The band was always meant for more ears and it seems this may be the final push they need. But, hell, who knows what comes from here, the fun seems to be in guessing where they’ll hop to next.

Support the artist. Buy it: HERE

0 Comments

Summer Twins – “Demons”

Burger staples Summer Twins have a new album out that’s full of sunshine pop and rainy day strummers and the track “Demons” is probably tops among the bunch. Rooted in their 60’s jangle aesthetic, the Flower Power cult imagery meshes quite nicely with the song, making for a darker turn for the band when it all goes wrong. If you haven’t had a chance to check into Summer Twins, this makes for an excellent entry point.

Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Six Organs of Admittance – Dust and Chimes

This one’s still a little fresh in the ears for this column, but what the hell the turn of this last century is probably further off than I want to admit. It seems just around the corner that the clock ticked 2000 and Ben Chasney was picking his way into a second album, emblazoned then with a washed out photo cover that’s replaced with a much more appropriate woodsy backdrop on the new version. Dark Noontide would forever be the moment when Chasney broke into a wider consciousness but this predecessor really brings him into his own and out of the sketchbook patterns of his debut. Its a lush album built on a love of raga and Fahey and feeling very much in line with the trend down psych-folk inroads at the time. Being that this was released in the vinyl desert years it only apeared on CD at the time, leaving fans of Ben’s catalog with a hole to fill on the turntable. But now Holy Mountain’s gotten this on the table and ready for psych fanatics the world over. Complete with a new video here for “Blue Sun Chiming” by Magik Markers’ Elisa Ambrogio.

Listen:


Support the artist. Buy it HERE

0 Comments