Browsing Category Reissues

Alejandro Jodorowsky – The Holy Mountain

As chaotic as Alejandro Jodorowsky’s psychedelic epic The Holy Mountain is from a visual standpoint, the soundtrack gives back in equal measure, dialing all over the spectrum from plaintive folk to Tuvan throat singing, epic orchestrals to noise and rock. If you’ve ever seen the cult classic, then you know that the movie is overwhelming to say the least and only really coherent to probably about 13% of the populace in the midst of an Ayahuasca comedown. Its heavy handed but also rather beautiful and since its release its legend has only grown. The movie’s score finds a way to keep pace with the barrage of non-linear imagery, bursts of color and shifts in tone so adeptly that its a testament to its originators. Jodorowsky enlisted the help of Don Cherry and Ron Frangipane (he of The Archies fame) to bring the musical companion of the film to life. Along with Jodorowsky’s own conducting, the team proves well more than formidable. Traditionally the score hasn’t been widely available and certainly not on vinyl but RealGone have rounded it up on double vinyl.




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Popul Vuh – Letzte Tage – Letzte Nächte

The catalog of Popol Vuh is dense and rather intimidating to find entry points into. Sure, for the true heads out there the beginning of Fricke’s universe, Affenstunde, only makes sense, but there are plenty of other nicely set moments that don’t necessitate charting the history of the band. Though up until now many of these have not been available on vinyl, but thanks to some stellar work by Wah Wah/Supersonic Sounds the band’s later works have now found room on your shelf. The integration of guitar into the band’s sound really starts to take over on Das Hohelied Salomos, where Daniel Fichelscher really starts to become an integral part of the group, but its here on Letzte Tage – Letzte Nächte that he really pushes to the forefront of their sound. Still balancing light and dark, psychedelic heaviness and a pastoral Eastern vibe that’s central to the Popul Vuh sound, this record sees them stretch out and find place in the Krautrock canon that show’s some love for their UK brethren in prog – feeling very versed in Floydisms and the grandeur of Yes. The band were in a very verdant period at this time also working on some of their numerous collaborations with Werner Herzog. These also appear in the newly minted series of reissues by Wah Wah/Supersonic and remain great points of entry into the band’s psychedelic odyssey.



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Pan – Pan

70’s prog had its enclaves for sure. Germany always gets its due. The US and UK are well, maybe even over represented, but Denmark never really hits the map. Pan were on of the most hard hitting and inventive Danish prog acts of the 70’s and over the years this eponymous record has achieved some cult collector status. The majority of the album revolves around muscular riffs but the band balances the sweat factor with some pastoral organ and acoustic touches that give it a more storied appeal. The band was founded by French ex-pat Robert Leilevre who was wandering Europe to evade military service. When he landed in Denmark the pieces fell in line for what would become Pan. Though Leilevre was rumored to be difficult to work with and the band would split after this sole LP with members filtering on to other bands including Denmark’s other famous export Culpeper’s Orchard, Blast Furnace and Delta Blues Band. Shadoks has done this one up nicely, with far more attention given than even recent CD reissues. Poster, printed inner and a bonus 7″ on a 500 press. This is definitely one that will go fast.



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Jean-Paul Sartre Experience – I Like Rain: The Story of The Jean-Paul Sartre Experience

Fire Records have gone through the exhaustive work of compiling this retrospective of the JPSE and its well worth the time to wade through the band’s storied history. Their debut is a charming record that felt apart from the rest of the Flying Nun stable. There’s jangle, but more often there’s a subtle wash of grey-skied melancholy and an early indie pop simplicity that feels more akin to the outset of the Creation records stable than many of their contemporaries at home. Love Songs introduced the band with the hit that this collection takes its name from and its a pretty fitting entry point to the band’s catalog.

Size of Food has always overshadowed the debut in critical acclaim but at the time of its release it fell on many deaf ears. Delayed by two years due to some financial finagling on Flying Nun’s part, the album finally hit shelves without much in the way of fanfare. But hindsight being what it is, this one stands as a benchmark of fractured pop that would have lasting reverberations even if it didn’t shake scenes at the time of its issue. Their final album, Bleeding Star saw the band enter the studio, amp up the production (some critics would argue too much) and finally allow themselves some international acclaim. But where the album saws off a bit of their connection to jangle, it dives headlong into a buzzing sea of guitars that buoy that same melancholy they’d always let through with a stronger punch. This album also garnered support from Matador in the States and they finally made it over for some dates only to pull themselves apart in the process. This would prove their last effort. In addition to the albums themselves this collection ropes in bonus tracks, tracks from the alternate US/NZ pressings and singles. They might not top your list of essential bands of the late 80s/early 90s but spend a little time with the JPSE and let this collection wash over you. It will definitely surprise you.





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