Browsing Category Tracks

Garcia Peoples – “Crown of Thought”

Another great peek into the latest Garcia Peoples lands today. “Crown of Thought” delves further into the excellent second side of Nightcap at Wit’s End. Like Agitation Free before them, the band’s worked up a killer flip-side suite that pushes into the heart of the sun — blissful, knotted, and rolling around in the brain with a molten glow that’s hard to shake. The song pushes the Garcia’s model closer to the levitating energy of their live shows. One Step Behind aside, this is one of the most ambitious GP albums to date. It’s hard to follow such a heavy statement as their last LP, as I’m sure they’re aware, but here the band are starting to work their way into the nebulous folds of prog with a one hand laying down the needle deep into Fairport’s ascension out of folk and into the electric ether and the other still feeling along the Help Yourself / Mighty Baby axis. The band’s already set a hook into my heart, but this one’s only sinking the barb deeper and drawing darker blood. If the stage can’t have GP then the turntable ought to suffice for now..



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John Jeffrey – “Leaving Franklin”

Got a real nice cut today from John Jeffrey, who’s probably best known as the drummer for Moon Duo, though he’s been working up this brew of Kosmiche synth tracks over the past year ‘n change so his renown seems subject to change once this one hits the atmosphere. Jeffrey’s debut LP, Passage is out October 30th on Ripley and Sanae’s Jean Sandwich records, which has been home to the first Rose City Band LP and a split with Kikagaku Moyo. “Leaving Franklin” blends a skittering beat with heat hazed synths that push past the usual ‘70s German markers and into something moodier and more inclined to fill in the vacant crevices of the mind. There’s some Ashra in here — at least a taste of the slick plasticity of Correlations — and perhaps a whiff of Heldon, but Jeffrey’s pushing even further into narcotic soundtrack territory that’s somewhere between blissful surrender and purposeful suppression. The song has a low sun in the sky, a strong buzz in the vein. It’s either the beginning of a self-destructive bender or the sobering end. The track reverberates a slip through the cocaine buzz of ‘70s cinema, the kind that’s beautiful on the outside but corroded and caustic under the surface. The song’s only a taste of what Jeffrey has put forth on his new LP and I can assure you that the rest stands up to the queasy optimism that resides in the bones of “Leaving Frankin.” The LP lands this fall from Jean Sandwich and its already a 2020 essential.



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Tracy Bryant – “Between Us”

L.A. songwriter Tracy Bryant released his third studio album just about a year ago and the first follow-up comes in the form of a limited single split between RSTB faves Six Tonnes de Chair (France) and Third Eye Stimuli (Aus). “Between Us” was cut during the sessions for Hush but Bryant notes that it didn’t fit with the album, and I’d agree. The melancholy tone of Hush isn’t as present in the sun-streaked pop bounce of “Between Us.” Instead there’s a sense of motion and crisp air. The song’s not jubilant, but its trading wistful for winking which seems like a natural fit for Bryant. Despite its studio sheen, the simple setup feels like it shares a bit of DNA with Cronin and Segall around their humble Trouble In Mind days. Bryant hangs the song on the strength of a hummable acoustic hook, sweater-hugged harmonies, and a the kind of natural saunter that endears a song almost immediately. With a lyrical smirk at someone’s know-it-all hijinks, the song is pretty relatable too. The single hits digital outlets on Wednesday, but you can preview it below in the meantime.




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Silver Synthetic – “Out Of The Darkness”

The ragged confines of the Cosmic American summer are seeping in all around us and there’s one more to add to the queue today. Eschewing the garage crunch that he’s usually corralling with Bottomfeeders, Chris Lyons teams ups with mems of his daytime digs and Jeff The Brotherhood for an EP on Third Man that’s got more than a little jam in its bones. The title track pairs some hypnotic rhythm with a choogled soul that simmers throughout the song. The prickled guitars in the opening are shot through with the Maplethrope-veined prickle from the grittier side of the ‘70s but the band rounds it out into a deepened groove that drops out of Television’s embrace and into the sunny sways once again. The band’s got a full EP in similar fashion on the way and rumbles of a full LP for Third Man as well.




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David Nance – “When The Covers Come Off”

I definitely felt the heft of Nance’s Peaced and Slightly Pulverized when it landed couple of years back. The album thickened Nance’s stew to a stiff porridge and then lit the whole pot on fire. It seemed like the next move could only come in the form of another torched trip to the studio, but Nance isn’t one to live by expectations. That Third Man follow-up single might have given us all an inkling, but hell that’s a one-off, right? What was next? With the first cut from his upcoming Staunch Honey he answers the question neatly — a slide into the country sweat that shines under the Omaha sun and a return of sorts to his loose-laced countenance. Though, while it’s a rekindling of the scrap that sutured his early albums — playing into the hip-strung blues with a Teac crunch on ‘em — he’s still brought a touch of the toughness with him from Peaced. The pace is reclined but there’s power in those amp-fried licks. The thunder has passed and now its time to get people out and movin’. “When The Covers Come Off” requires volume to vibe, so don’t keep this one under the headphones long. Staunch Honey is out November 13th on Trouble In Mind.



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The Reds, Pinks and Purples – “Last Summer In A Rented Room”

Very excited that there’s more RP&P news today. While Glenn’s kept the digital coffers quite full over the past few months properly spoiling us all, the band’s physical offerings are still in short supply and heavy on the import fodder. While this news still comes from across the Atlantic, it’s nice to see a 12″ mini-LP entering the fray today via Tough Love. Meant to be an EP, but packed with songs true to the style of The Reds, Pinks and Purples, You Might Be Happy Someday gives a physical space to eight of the tracks that have eked out on Bandcamp over last Winter, acting as a nice companion piece to the “I Should Have Helped You” 7″ that came out around May. Fans of the RPP mixture of swooning melodies and crushing narratives won’t be disappointed with the first offering. “Last Summer In A Rented Room” is an audible lump in the throat, ennui made manifest. The song sits on the listener’s chest like a sob caught between chords. It’s a beautiful piece of somber jangle that slots in nicely alongside the rest of the band’s catalog. Not sure if there’s a US distro picking these up just yet, but you can nab one from Bandcamp on pale pink vinyl straight from the label. The 12″ is out October 2nd and keep an ear perked because there’s still talk of a Slumberland LP on the way as well.




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Gunn-Truscinski Duo – “Valley Spiral”

A whole lotta great news packed into one post here. First and foremost, Gunn-Truscinski Duo return and the first track off of their upcoming Soundkeeper is as slinking and satisfying as they’ve ever been. Steve Gunn’s been plenty busy holding it down solo over the past few years, but he and John Truscinski have kept up a partnership that pays out in knotted riffs and loose-limbed brilliance over the past few years. The bonus to this beast of at 2xLP release is that it marks the first of a new 20th Anniversary series by Three Lobed Records that’s both bound up as a limited bundle and available a la carte for those that don’t choose to enter into a year-long anticipation endeavor. But how ya gonna pass up that full package with names like Daniel Bachman, Sunburned Hand of the Man, Six Organs of Admittance, Body/Head and Sonic Youth on the ticket. That’s not to mention a bonus LP with secret performers, and if these are all the announced bands, what treasures could lie in that seventh entry? My love affair with Three Lobed has spanned the entirety of the site and their subscription series always prove essential. 20 years is an admirable milestone and from the sounds of it, this is off to a great start.

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Sunfruits – “Mushroom Kingdom”

Aussies Sunfruits dropping in a last minute dose of psych-funk to let the summer slide away on a proper breeze. The band’s been kicking around for a few years, but this one caught my eye with an Ardneks cover and a dual release between France’s Six Tonnes de Chair and Australia’s Third Eye Stimuli. The song’s pulses into view on bass ripple, liquid-lounge guitar and a barrage of horns, all filtered through a beach party heat wave vibe that feels out of step with 2020, but aspirational all the same. There’s always plenty to love from the South Hemi psych market and the band have been paying dues over the past couple of years. Yet, this double A single, broken up by interludes feels like the band grabbing onto the sound that they’ve been searching for all along. The EP is out September 25th. Grab it now in a handful of limited colors.




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Smokescreens – “Fork In The Road”

It’s rare that the a band’s most prominent inspiration locks on to produce an album, but it seems that after a couple of LPs with clear inspirations from The Clean, L.A. janglers Smokescreens nabbed the nod from David Kilgour himself and a more perfect pairing couldn’t have been born. The Kiwipop luminary headed to The States to produce the band’s third LP, A Strange Dream. and his hand guides the band to a more crystalline version of their sound. He even contributes a cover painting to the record. The band’s clearly hitting their stride within the first few bars, and the first single from the upcoming record is a bittersweet saunter through South Hemi pop — pulling at not only The Clean, but from the ranks of The Bats and The Go-Betweens for inspiration. “Fork In The Road” swoons into view with a rambling guitar line that opens up into cloudy harmonies and hilly basslines. Here’s hoping (and betting) the rest of the record is as delightful as this. A Strange Dream is out October 30th on Slumberland.



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Daniel Romano – “A Rat Without A Tail”

You certainly have to hand it to Daniel Romano, the dude’s got a work ethic. After holing up during the pandemic with a band that was already slated to be on tour for the next few months, the man’s pumped out an astonishing string of albums over the half a year, producing a digital-only catalog that would cast a shadow over most band’s works instantaneously. This marks his 9th release of 2020 and it’s a proper distillation of his sound — rooted in the ‘70s road-worn sound that could hop from Midwest roadhouse to L.A. main stage with ease. The songwriter’s dashed through country corners and let the buttons draw tight on a sound that’s practiced but not so polished that it feels manufactured. The Outfit, as he’s want to call his band, keeps the stew bubbling to a simmer and it all comes to a head on “A Rat Without A Tail.”

Romano’s songwriting is dashed across the stars, with a touch of power pop threading through, but ragged enough that it feels like the songwriter’s still got the marks of crashing on a couch in his recent past. It’s clear that this album might be the launch point for an artist that’s already built up a heavy live reputation and with the last year, a fervent Bandcamp following as well. This is just the very hint of Romano’s prowess and I implore you to dig in further with abandon.





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