Browsing Category Tracks

Bobby Would – “So To Say”

A second LP lands in January from DIY pop slinger Bobby Would and this first taste of the album sets up some nice expectations. Xeroxed vocals hover in the background with Bobby’s guitar pounding out a heavy strum up front. Feelings of lost pop pushes swell up between the notes on “So To Say” giving this space on the shelf next to Bobb Trimble and R. Stevie Moore and I suppose by extension Ariel Pink and Gary War following along in their shadows. That acoustic chugs like a train until Would burns away the rumble with a caustic lead. The new LP is out January 25th from UK label Low Company. This one’s probably not going to get enough shouts before then, but I recommend getting this one on your list.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

New Bums – “Billy, God Damn”

I love it when a band resurfaces out of the black hole of the zeitgeist to deliver something that you didn’t know you needed on a Tuesday morning. New Bums emerged much the same way on their debut — a collaboration between longtime RSTB faves Donovan Quinn and Ben Chasny, that paired up the psych-folk veterans for a worn and weary record that felt like it had an audible hangover. It was a brilliantly ruffled album and they emerge seven years later with another record that’s just as comfortably broken and bruised. The first taste of the LP, “Billy, God Damn” sails in on their smoke and soil rubbed delivery. Can’t wait for this one, but we’ll all have to be collectively patient until the record lands on shelves March 19th.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Nightshift – “Make Kin”

Got a new wafer of post-punk goodness out of the Trouble in Mind camp today and as usual the label is scouring all the best scenes for ya. Nabbing Nightshift out of the always fertile Glasgow pool, the band offers up a new track that’s navigating the brittle and damaged end of the genre’s spectrum. I’m always a sucker for a track that’s coiled and cool, and Nightshift doesn’t disappoint. While they’ve got some similarities with post-punk forebears like The Raincoats, Marine Girls, or Young Marble Giants, there’s an uneasiness to “Make Kin” that has me reaching for a few Aussie exports like Ostraaly or J. McFarlane’s Reality Guest, especially with the lacing of woodwinds over the top. The track’s more bracing than anything out of those camps, though, and it bodes well for what’s to come from the band. Guitars rumble over a loping beat, but the whole thing’s about vocals — measured and driving, Eothen Stern takes the temperature down in the room about 20 degrees with every passage she unfurls. Really looking forward to this one. Zoe is out February 26th.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Blades of Joy – “Snow Queen”

I’m pulled at odds on this one. While I’m notoriously Christmas Music averse, I do love San Francisco’s Blades of Joy, and the idea of new music from them is just too enticing. The band’s debut was a warm froth of indie pop and dream pop, but on this collection of Christmas oriented songs, they’re stripping the cocoon all the way back. The tape contains some traditionals, a little Broadway, and even a contentious, yet often beloved Wham inclusion. There’s also this rather stunning original by the band’s Inna Showalter. The song forgoes the instrumental approach altogether for some stark choral folk vibes. Lock into the haunting, iciness of “Snow Queen” below.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Bingo Trappers – “Leonardo’s Wings”

Excited to see another jangler out from Dutch psych-poppers Bingo Trappers. Their LP on Grapefruit from a couple of years ago was a damn delight and this one sounds poised to pick up the pieces nicely. “Leonardo’s Wings,” finds them winding down the same ‘60s-indebted path — strumming breezy and bold with a bit of a swing rocking this one on the breeze in sunny perfection. The band makes their case for digging in the Paisley garden once again, dressing the song in nods to the past without getting tangled in passé riffs. Hoping that this album captures the same sweet spirit of Elizabethan, and from the sounds of things, it just might. The new LP, Giddy Wishes is out December 18th through a tangle of labels, Grapefruit/Morc Tapes/Unread/Almost Halloween Time.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Hobby – “The Humblest”

Growing out of the remains of Deaf Parade, Parisian band Hobby comes into their own on a debut solo EP that’s chomping on a couple of great sounds. With a jangled backbone and a taste for fuzz pop, the band rips into “The Humblest” like an overlooked cut from the DGC demo bin. The song trips over itself with a tangle of guitars but settles into a slow-simmer Pavement patter that explodes with a rather ravenous chorus that melts the paint at the top edges of the room. While the band definitely owes a few debts to the class of ’94 on this one, they do it with a love that comes through earnestly. The song’s just the tip of things on their upcoming 7” from Hidden Bay / RDS REC. Out on Dec 11th.





Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Donald Miller – “The Man In The Well”

While Miller might be known more for his reality shifting psychedelics in Borbetomagus, on his latest LP he’s stripped all the way back, delivering a suite of 12-string rambles that throw the Takoma school through a feverish wind. There’s a blues base in “The Man In The Well,” but Miller isn’t content to simply lean on virtuosity and let the ripple ease into the the banks of the river. His works bend and scrape at the traditions that he so clearly loves, with tracks on the upcoming Transgression!!! dedicated to Davey Williams, Jack Rose, and intriguingly enough Squeaky Frome alongside a cover of Charlie Patton. The new LP finds a home with acoustic haven VDSQ and its rapped in a rather striking cover from SEEN studios, which only adds to the charms. The LP finds its way out February 5th.



Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Pearl Charles – “Imposter”

The new LP from Pearl Charles keeps giving with a third single out this week that’s splashed with just a touch more AM gold than on the past two. Still weathered with the California cool that permeates her new album, the new song bounces on a sunny beat but gets caught the heartsick swirl of keys, a vertigo tug of guitars, and Pearl’s sighed vocals that betray a lostness that’s easy to relate to. The song’s based in feeling like a fraud, sure to be found out at anytime by peers and friends at any moment. The harsh self-reflection and knowing doubt bump against the song’s seeming calm with a slight tension, though this still fits nicely into the album’s wood paneled wonderland.

Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Henrik Appel – “Wake Me Up”

PNKSLM is always a solid bet for garage pop and psych sway and this new cut from Henrik Appel is no exception. Falling into the garage camp, the label starts out 2021 strong. The former Lions Den member, Appel, struck out solo on an LP in 2018 and his sophomore step expands on some of his whims from the LP that crept away from his former bandmates. There’s a low-slung quality to “Wake Me Up,” a simmering just below the surface that never quite explodes through but rocks back and forth with a quiet cool. The song saws on a gritted riff, but sweetens itself with some harmony vox and a skid of sax as the song slides to a close. The label’s been making a name for itself with sour-pop gems like Cherry Pickles and ShitKid and this one files in quite nicely alongside those others. The new LP arrives January 8th.




Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments

Chronophage – “Any Junkyard Dreams”

A nice surprise out of Austin’s Chronophage springs up today. The band’s last LP Prolog For Tomorrow checked a lot of boxes in the scuffed indie bin a couple of years back and news of a follow-up LP heading out on November 23 reared its head today. The new LP sees the band scrub a bit of the crust off of their sound, but the fidelity bump doesn’t dimmish their acerbic bite. First cut, “Any Junkyard Dreams” is brittle with shards of post-punk guitar butting heads with quite a cushy chorus. The tension between the guitars that seem about ready to break and Sarah Beames’ vocals drive the song deep into the listener’s skull. If you missed out on the band last time around, this is a perfect time to jump onto the wagon before The Pig Kiss’d hits in a few weeks.





Support the artist. Buy it HERE.

0 Comments