Browsing Category Tracks

Savoy Motel – “Sorry People”

Good news for all the moonbabies out there, the psych/soul/glam/funk barrage of Savoy Motel has found a home at What’s Your Rupture?, spinning their once obscure single into an upcoming album’s worth of sparkle sodden mutant handclap boogie that feels lived in and crinkly as a Twinkeyz single run through the woodchipper and neck-stomped by Slade. This new taste of the LP is a heavy hitter that sneers and holds our Angel of No Mercy, Jay Reatard as its inspiration. There’s less melted sun splatter than on that breakout “Hot One” but still plenty to love about the platform heel stomp, disco click ‘n shuffle and paint peeler of a solo that adorn “Sorry People.” Definitely psyched on Jeffery Novak and co. fleshing this project out into a true weirdo run backwards through the television tube memory of our childhoods.

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The Holydrug Couple – “Whatever You Want”

Chilean psych’s premiere dreampop export are back in action, this time creating a very real soundtrack to a very imaginary film. The track “Whatever You Want” finds the band still in the blissful wake of their last album, Moonlust and reaching further for that moment when the sun blinds your eyes and warms the soul. The track is swept along by a pounding beat that’s easily tempered by the dreamy vocal chants and twisted nicely with the addition of some vintage synth stabs. Paired with fellow first taste, the instrumental “Vase of Flowers,” its hard not to feel a debt to Air and in particular the Virgin Suidices Soundtrack. There’s a similar feeling of vintage yet timeless to the track, employing a light touch with a heavy shadow. Can’t wait to hear the whole thing, as I imagine both of these are just puzzle pieces in the world of Soundtrack for Pantanal.



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Bloods – “Bring My Walls Down”

Syndey’s Bloods return for a sophomore album and the first track blows in like a sweet breeze across the ocean. They soften the attack but keep their chewy ’90s center strong, transitioning from garage pop into a gnarled bit of Alt rock that mines The Muffs, Letters To Cleo and Veruca Salt. There’s been a steady turn towards the ’90s in the past couple of years but its always great when bands fight the right touchstones, and this is definitely a welcomed refinement for Bloods. The song finds the band and singer MC ruminating on a crush that lowers all defenses, the kind of overwhelming infatuation that leaves you vulnerable because you can’t help but sputter out the first things that pop into your head. I noticed that the band had DJ’d a night of teen movie soundtrack classics last year, and that alone makes perfect sense, since “Bring My Walls Down” feels like it might find itself right at home sandwiched between cuts on the Clueless Soundtrack or fueling 10 Things I Hate About You‘s femme pop heavy sound. If they were still making the kind of teen comedies that leaned heavily on turning Shakespeare and Jane Austen into parables for the mall set, some music supervisor would be losing their shit over this one.




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Ausmuteants – “Music Writers”

Ausmuteants know how to cut to the damn core. Not only do they insist on reminding us why Devo will always be the most badass assassins of the new wave revolution, but they do it while insulting the very cycle of press and regurgitation that prevails in this age of music journalism. Hell, I sympathize completely. Commentary and criticism have gone by the wayside in favor of quick wrist content and onesheet pilfering to ease the speed. You’re getting hard pressed to find an opinion on why songs are good, just a link and a puff of smoke from the label’s copy. But aside from the biting lyricism, “Music Writers” is stacked full of the sci-fi twinge of synth and caffeinated guitars that Ausmuteants have made their own over the last couple of years, and to be truthful, they’ve rarely done it as well as they have here. Its them at their most acerbic and their catchiest. Its the full package. So lap it up.




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Radar Eyes – “Community”

I’m almost a little wary to believe this is the same Radar Eyes that surfaced in 2012 on their eponymous LP. Where once there was a murky garage chug, now the band have blown full on into a jangled ’80s headspace that’s cribbing hard from their Echo and the Bunnymen and Cure collections; none maybe more so than “Community” which seems like it could easily pass for an Echo b-side lost to the winds. The band is nailing the theatrical sweep, the dark crashes of synth and guitar and Anthony Cozzi’s booming vocals find themselves stretching over the top in every sense of the phrase. There’s a strain of XTC winding its way through there as well and, while all these influences don’t necessarily speak to creating an original footprint with their new direction, they’re paying their 80’s homage right. “Community” is a nice bit of jangle n’ jolt that finds itself stuck your head every time.

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Cory Hanson – “Ordinary People”

Wand is pretty damn prolific as it is, so the news that the band’s Cory Hanson is embarking on a solo record seems like he’s pushing his limits. Though the sound of “Ordinary People” is worlds away from Wand’s powder keg of psych stomp and garage explosion so maybe this Hanson letting his guard down and searching the other side of the coin. Starting with a swell of strings and building to a gorgeous bit of chamber folk that comes on with fragile, yet orchestrated appeal of 60’s nuggets like Gandalf (there’s a bit of a “Hang On To A Dream” quality), bits of The Zombies or even Susan Christie; “Ordinary People” is a psych-folk gem that’s light on the psych but heavy on the emotional impact. Its a new take on Hanson’s songwriting and to tell the truth, the lighter side looks good on him. Not that I’m going to shrug at any fire and flash from the Wand camp, but this kind of lush folk is always a welcome ticket around here. Can’t wait to see how this song stacks up with the whole album. The world needs more weird folk nuggets out there.

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Jacuzzi Boys – “Boys Like Blood”

Just can’t help myself, whenever there’s a new Jacuzzi Boys on the horizon, the excitement gets a bit palpable. After a solid self-released EP, the band returns with a proper full length for their own Mag Mag imprint and its shifting them away from the garage grit of their past, through the power-pop neon of Happy Damage and into a nineties inflected grunge pop that’s roping in a “Cannonball” groove and Matthew Sweet towers of guitar. They’ve always had those more polished instincts roiling under their past releases but it seems with this one they’re fully going for it. Its often a mixed blessing when bands go in for the pop sheen. It can go too far and feel like a plastic version of what you always loved about them, but that doesn’t seem to be the case here at all. Its big and bright and bold, but with a fuzzed out love of ’90s thickness and a chorus that sticks it all the right brain crags. Can’t wait for more of this one in October.

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Vexx – “Do What You Want To”

Olympia’s Vexx take on punk like it was just beginning to sprout legs. They’re cued into the kind of frantic tear that drove Television or The Voidoids, sure, but they seem to have locked into a slightly later vision that might encompass French upstarts The Dogs, UK nuggets The Only Ones or Canada’s undersung Teenage Head. Both M’ladys and Upset The Rhythm kicked out a previous release from the band, so this one comes to no shortage of baited breath, and with good reason. Solos flare, the vocals sneer and the band plays like they want listeners to buck some system, somewhere. Sure punk is dead, but that doesn’t mean we can’t all find solace in a good ole fashioned rocker now and again. Vexx are still pursuing that incendiary vision of punk you’ve read about and probably always thought existed as you embarked on your first DIY show. Maybe they prove its still possible to be vital. Maybe we kinda need them to. Mabye the pontificating doesn’t matter as much as the sweat drenched pummel of “Do What You Want To” in the end. Maybe we all need to just shut up and dance sometimes.

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Axis: Sova – “Violent Yellow”

Just under a year after Brett Sova hit the world with his debut for God? Records, the Chicagoan returns, cleaned up sonically, but no less ready to dive into the dirty grit of motorik rock n’ roll and heavy psych. With Cave/Bitchin’ Bajas’ Cooper Crane at the decks, Sova has recorded a follow-up to Early Surf and its peeling back the cover on his grit soaked grind, wiping some of the debris from his lo-fi lockdown last year and letting the fuzz and fry bubble over with a crispness that suits him. The first taste of Motor Earth is a psych-splattered groover that’s one part kin to the Krautrock dirge of those other motorik menaces from ’16, The Writhing Squares, and one part ozone caked psych fry that’s burning down the button down lock step Krautrock altogether. Its a good first impression for the record and sounding like Axis: Sova is still one to watch.




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Hartle Road – “Garbage Wizard”

Columbus, Mississippi’s Hartle Road unleashes a smooth and woozy brand of psych pop on their debut LP, Maxx. “Garbage Wizard” chugs its way into this world, bashing sweatstained riffs through the quaking vision of heat ripples before slipping into a creamy chorus that lives up to the band’s self-imposed aesthetic of a Phil Spector sound with jail cell acoustics. Then they tear the whole thing down with a tin foil transmission bridge that feels like it might teeter off the brink and blow it all apart. Its the kind of track that seems like it has everything working against it, so it can’t possibly fail, right? But all the pieces work together just right. Toby Hartleroad and crew seem to be digesting their influences well, churning out a psych pop platter that’s got plenty to love for everyone.



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